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Title: Optimal design of a pilot OTEC power plant in Taiwan

Abstract

In this paper, an optimal design concept has been utilized to find the best designs for a complex and large-scale ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant. THe OTEC power plant under this study is divided into three major subsystems consisting of power subsystem, seawater pipe subsystem, and containment subsystem. The design optimization model for the entire OTEC plant is integrated from these sub-systems under the considerations of their own various design criteria and constraints. The mathematical formulations of this optimization model for the entire OTEC plant are described. The design variables, objective function, and constraints for a pilot plant under the constraints of the feasible technologies at this stage in Taiwan have been carefully examined and selected.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (TW))
  2. (Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (TW))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5339251
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Energy Resources Technology; (United States); Journal Volume: 113:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION; OPTIMIZATION; OCEAN THERMAL POWER PLANTS; DESIGN; TAIWAN; PILOT PLANTS; ASIA; CONVERSION; ENERGY CONVERSION; FUNCTIONAL MODELS; ISLANDS; POWER PLANTS; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION; SOLAR POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; 140800* - Solar Energy- Ocean Energy Systems

Citation Formats

Tseng, C.H., Kao, K.Y., and Yang, J.C. Optimal design of a pilot OTEC power plant in Taiwan. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1115/1.2905914.
Tseng, C.H., Kao, K.Y., & Yang, J.C. Optimal design of a pilot OTEC power plant in Taiwan. United States. doi:10.1115/1.2905914.
Tseng, C.H., Kao, K.Y., and Yang, J.C. 1991. "Optimal design of a pilot OTEC power plant in Taiwan". United States. doi:10.1115/1.2905914.
@article{osti_5339251,
title = {Optimal design of a pilot OTEC power plant in Taiwan},
author = {Tseng, C.H. and Kao, K.Y. and Yang, J.C.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, an optimal design concept has been utilized to find the best designs for a complex and large-scale ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant. THe OTEC power plant under this study is divided into three major subsystems consisting of power subsystem, seawater pipe subsystem, and containment subsystem. The design optimization model for the entire OTEC plant is integrated from these sub-systems under the considerations of their own various design criteria and constraints. The mathematical formulations of this optimization model for the entire OTEC plant are described. The design variables, objective function, and constraints for a pilot plant under the constraints of the feasible technologies at this stage in Taiwan have been carefully examined and selected.},
doi = {10.1115/1.2905914},
journal = {Journal of Energy Resources Technology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 113:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}
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