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Title: Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic). American shad. [Alosa sapidissima]

Abstract

The American shad (Alosa sapidissima) was the most valuable food fish on the Atlantic coast perior to the 1940's; but landings have declined drastically since that time, and sport fishing has become more important than commercial fishing in most rivers stocks still exist. The American shad is anadromous: adults congregate offshore in areas within the North Atlantic Bight during summer, move southward in coastal waters during fall and early winter, and move up rivers to spawn during late winter and spring. In rivers in the South Atlantic Region, the spawning run peaks during January and February, but can continue through April and May. Larval shad live in upriver areas and eat a variety of small invertebrates. Juveniles gradually move downriver and live estuaries, where they grow to about 100 mm in length and migrate to sea where they live 3-5 years before maturing. Most American shad return to their natal river to spawn; and in the South Altantic Bight, most adults die after spawning once. Development of eggs requires water temperatures of 14 to 20/sup 0/C, dissolved oxygen concentrations of at least 5 mg/l, and current velocities capable of buoying eggs during incubation. Downstream transport of the young and spawningmore » migrations of adults can be adversely affected by excessive alteration of the river flow.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Univ., Athens (USA). Georgia Cooperative Fishery Research Unit; Fish and Wildlife Service, Slidell, LA (USA). National Wetlands Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
5327907
Report Number(s):
TR-EL-82-4/82-11.45
ON: TI86901599
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANADROMOUS FISHES; ECOLOGY; ATLANTIC OCEAN; COASTAL WATERS; FISHING INDUSTRY; HABITAT; MORPHOLOGY; RIVERS; TAXONOMY; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; BIOLOGY; FISHES; INDUSTRY; SEAS; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS; VERTEBRATES; 520100* - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Facey, D E, and Van Den Avyle, M J. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic). American shad. [Alosa sapidissima]. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Facey, D E, & Van Den Avyle, M J. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic). American shad. [Alosa sapidissima]. United States.
Facey, D E, and Van Den Avyle, M J. 1986. "Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic). American shad. [Alosa sapidissima]". United States.
@article{osti_5327907,
title = {Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic). American shad. [Alosa sapidissima]},
author = {Facey, D E and Van Den Avyle, M J},
abstractNote = {The American shad (Alosa sapidissima) was the most valuable food fish on the Atlantic coast perior to the 1940's; but landings have declined drastically since that time, and sport fishing has become more important than commercial fishing in most rivers stocks still exist. The American shad is anadromous: adults congregate offshore in areas within the North Atlantic Bight during summer, move southward in coastal waters during fall and early winter, and move up rivers to spawn during late winter and spring. In rivers in the South Atlantic Region, the spawning run peaks during January and February, but can continue through April and May. Larval shad live in upriver areas and eat a variety of small invertebrates. Juveniles gradually move downriver and live estuaries, where they grow to about 100 mm in length and migrate to sea where they live 3-5 years before maturing. Most American shad return to their natal river to spawn; and in the South Altantic Bight, most adults die after spawning once. Development of eggs requires water temperatures of 14 to 20/sup 0/C, dissolved oxygen concentrations of at least 5 mg/l, and current velocities capable of buoying eggs during incubation. Downstream transport of the young and spawning migrations of adults can be adversely affected by excessive alteration of the river flow.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5327907}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1986},
month = {4}
}

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