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Title: Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples

Abstract

Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impactedmore » waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Maryland, College Park
OSTI Identifier:
5323595
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Appl. Environ. Microbiol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 51:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANTIBIOTICS; TOLERANCE; ATLANTIC OCEAN; WATER POLLUTION; BACTERIA; BIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION; PLASMIDS; CRESOLS; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; QUINONES; DNA; MARYLAND; PUERTO RICO; SEWAGE; TIN; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; AROMATICS; CELL CONSTITUENTS; DRUGS; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION II; FEDERAL REGION III; GREATER ANTILLES; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ISLANDS; METALS; MICROORGANISMS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHENOLS; POLLUTION; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; USA; WASTES; WEST INDIES 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 550700 -- Microbiology

Citation Formats

Baya, A.M., Brayton, P.R., Brown, V.L., Grimes, D.J., Russek-Cohen, E., and Colwell, R.R.. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Baya, A.M., Brayton, P.R., Brown, V.L., Grimes, D.J., Russek-Cohen, E., & Colwell, R.R.. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples. United States.
Baya, A.M., Brayton, P.R., Brown, V.L., Grimes, D.J., Russek-Cohen, E., and Colwell, R.R.. 1986. "Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5323595,
title = {Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples},
author = {Baya, A.M. and Brayton, P.R. and Brown, V.L. and Grimes, D.J. and Russek-Cohen, E. and Colwell, R.R.},
abstractNote = {Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.},
doi = {},
journal = {Appl. Environ. Microbiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 51:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 6
}
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  • Staphylococci were isolated from rural and urban populations in Iraq, which were not known to be exposed to either heavy metals or antibiotics. The antibiotic and heavy metal resistance patterns of these strains were analyzed in both mannitol-fermenting and nonfermenting strains. Over 90% of the strains were resistant to at least one of the following antibiotics: penicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, lincomycin, and methicillin. In general, mannitol-fermenting strains were resistant to penicillin and cupric ions. Mannitol-negative strains were more frequently associated with mercuric ion and tetracycline resistance. Although resistance to penicillin and tetracycline can coexist, the combination of penicillin resistancemore » and tetracycline resistance usually occurred in mannitol-negative strains. The possibility of selection of heavy metal-resistant strains due to exposure to toxic levels of methylmercury was examined. No significant increase in mercuric ion-resistant strains of staphylococci or Escherichia coli were detected in exposed populations as compared to control groups. The possible reasons for this result are discussed.« less
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