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Title: Optimal control studies of solar heating systems

Abstract

In the past few years fuel prices have seen steady increases. Also, the supply of fuel has been on the decline. Because of these two problems there has been an increase in the number of solar heated buildings. Since conventional fuel prices are increasing and as a solar heating system represents a high capital cost it is desirable to obtain the maximum performance from a solar heating system. The control scheme that is used in a solar heated building has an effect on the performance of the solar system. The best control scheme possible would, of course, be desired. This report deals with the control problems of a solar heated building. The first of these problems is to control the inside temperature of the building and to minimize the fuel consumption. This problem applies to both solar and conventionally heated buildings. The second problem considered is to control the collector fluid flow to maximize the difference between the useful energy collected and the energy required to pump the fluid. The third problem is to control the enclosure temperature of a building which has two sources of heat, one solar and the other conventional.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
OSTI Identifier:
5320640
Report Number(s):
COO-4519-1
DOE Contract Number:
AS02-77CS34519
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS; OPTIMAL CONTROL; BUILDINGS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; ERRORS; FLOW REGULATORS; SOLAR SPACE HEATING; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; WEATHER; CONTROL; CONTROL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; HEATING; HEATING SYSTEMS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; SOLAR HEATING; SPACE HEATING; 140901* - Solar Thermal Utilization- Space Heating & Cooling

Citation Formats

Winn, C B. Optimal control studies of solar heating systems. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.2172/5320640.
Winn, C B. Optimal control studies of solar heating systems. United States. doi:10.2172/5320640.
Winn, C B. Tue . "Optimal control studies of solar heating systems". United States. doi:10.2172/5320640. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5320640.
@article{osti_5320640,
title = {Optimal control studies of solar heating systems},
author = {Winn, C B},
abstractNote = {In the past few years fuel prices have seen steady increases. Also, the supply of fuel has been on the decline. Because of these two problems there has been an increase in the number of solar heated buildings. Since conventional fuel prices are increasing and as a solar heating system represents a high capital cost it is desirable to obtain the maximum performance from a solar heating system. The control scheme that is used in a solar heated building has an effect on the performance of the solar system. The best control scheme possible would, of course, be desired. This report deals with the control problems of a solar heated building. The first of these problems is to control the inside temperature of the building and to minimize the fuel consumption. This problem applies to both solar and conventionally heated buildings. The second problem considered is to control the collector fluid flow to maximize the difference between the useful energy collected and the energy required to pump the fluid. The third problem is to control the enclosure temperature of a building which has two sources of heat, one solar and the other conventional.},
doi = {10.2172/5320640},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}

Technical Report:

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