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Title: Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

Abstract

Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies withmore » the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried, West Germany
OSTI Identifier:
5320142
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biochemistry; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; PHOTOSYNTHETIC REACTION CENTERS; AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; CHLOROPHYLL; HERBICIDES; PHOTOSYNTHETIC BACTERIA; PHYTOCHROMES; PROTEINS; RHODOPSEUDOMONAS; BACTERIA; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; HETEROCYCLIC ACIDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PESTICIDES; PIGMENTS; PORPHYRINS; 140505* - Solar Energy Conversion- Photochemical, Photobiological, & Thermochemical Conversion- (1980-); 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Michel, H., and Deisenhofer, J. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1021/bi00401a001.
Michel, H., & Deisenhofer, J. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II. United States. doi:10.1021/bi00401a001.
Michel, H., and Deisenhofer, J. Tue . "Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II". United States. doi:10.1021/bi00401a001.
@article{osti_5320142,
title = {Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II},
author = {Michel, H. and Deisenhofer, J.},
abstractNote = {Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.},
doi = {10.1021/bi00401a001},
journal = {Biochemistry; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 27:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1988},
month = {1}
}