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Title: Aqueous fluid drive process using minute solids in suspension

Abstract

The use of oil-displacing surfactants to increase the efficiency of a waterflooding secondary recovery method is well-known. It is also known that certain minute solids, which are capable of being driven through a stratum, function as carriers to transport oil-displacing surfactant deeper into the stratum. Representative of these surfactant carriers are particles of carbon black, kaolin and talc in the size range of 0.001 to 1 mu. Oil is recovered from a stratum by injecting an aqueous slug of minute solids in suspension, a nonionic oil-displacing surfactant in solution and a water-soluble lignosulfonate dispersant, which stabilizes the suspension. An aqueous drive medium, e.g., water or brine, may be injected into the stratum to displace the aqueous slug having solids in suspension through the stratum and drive crude oil to a producing well. (7 claims)

Inventors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5310531
Patent Number(s):
US 3476188
Assignee:
Phillips Petroleum Co.
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: Filed date 3 Jan 1969; Other Information: PAT-APPL-788,909
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL WELLS; WATERFLOODING; ADDITIVES; CARRIERS; ENHANCED RECOVERY; SURFACTANTS; WELL STIMULATION; FLUID INJECTION; RECOVERY; STIMULATION; WELLS; 020300* - Petroleum- Drilling & Production

Citation Formats

Harvey, R R. Aqueous fluid drive process using minute solids in suspension. United States: N. p., 1969. Web.
Harvey, R R. Aqueous fluid drive process using minute solids in suspension. United States.
Harvey, R R. Tue . "Aqueous fluid drive process using minute solids in suspension". United States.
@article{osti_5310531,
title = {Aqueous fluid drive process using minute solids in suspension},
author = {Harvey, R R},
abstractNote = {The use of oil-displacing surfactants to increase the efficiency of a waterflooding secondary recovery method is well-known. It is also known that certain minute solids, which are capable of being driven through a stratum, function as carriers to transport oil-displacing surfactant deeper into the stratum. Representative of these surfactant carriers are particles of carbon black, kaolin and talc in the size range of 0.001 to 1 mu. Oil is recovered from a stratum by injecting an aqueous slug of minute solids in suspension, a nonionic oil-displacing surfactant in solution and a water-soluble lignosulfonate dispersant, which stabilizes the suspension. An aqueous drive medium, e.g., water or brine, may be injected into the stratum to displace the aqueous slug having solids in suspension through the stratum and drive crude oil to a producing well. (7 claims)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1969},
month = {11}
}