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Title: Effect on non-host plants on movements of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)

Abstract

Movements of Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were studied in experimental plots of potatoes planted in monocultures and in polycultures with beans and/or marigolds. Rates of movement into and out of plots of varying plant composition were measured by mark-recapture of adult beetles. The amount of emigration was not affected by the presence of non-host plants. However, there were significantly more beetles moving into the pure stands of potatoes than into the plots containing non-host plants. This pattern is consistent with the idea that non-host plants act to mask host plants from potential herbivores, but do not affect the insect once it has located a host plant. It is thus unlikely that marigolds or beans repel Colorado potato beetles, since an increase in emigration would be expected if this were true. Beans are more effective than marigolds at deterring immigration, and both non-host plants together have an additive effect greater than one alone.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5297553
Report Number(s):
BNL-51534
ON: DE82016612
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH00016
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; INSECTS; PEST CONTROL; SOLANUM TUBEROSUM; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; BEHAVIOR; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; PHASEOLUS; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; CONTROL; DATA; INFORMATION; INVERTEBRATES; LEGUMINOSAE; NUMERICAL DATA; PLANTS; SOLANUM; 553000* - Agriculture & Food Technology; 510100 - Environment, Terrestrial- Basic Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Cort, R.P.. Effect on non-host plants on movements of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Cort, R.P.. Effect on non-host plants on movements of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). United States.
Cort, R.P.. Fri . "Effect on non-host plants on movements of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5297553,
title = {Effect on non-host plants on movements of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)},
author = {Cort, R.P.},
abstractNote = {Movements of Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were studied in experimental plots of potatoes planted in monocultures and in polycultures with beans and/or marigolds. Rates of movement into and out of plots of varying plant composition were measured by mark-recapture of adult beetles. The amount of emigration was not affected by the presence of non-host plants. However, there were significantly more beetles moving into the pure stands of potatoes than into the plots containing non-host plants. This pattern is consistent with the idea that non-host plants act to mask host plants from potential herbivores, but do not affect the insect once it has located a host plant. It is thus unlikely that marigolds or beans repel Colorado potato beetles, since an increase in emigration would be expected if this were true. Beans are more effective than marigolds at deterring immigration, and both non-host plants together have an additive effect greater than one alone.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}

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  • Field experiments were carried out to determine if a copper-based fungicide known to deter feeding by the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), in the laboratory, could suppress the growth of L. decemlineata populations in the field when used regularly for plant disease protection on tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants. Larval densities on plants treated with a fungicide formulated with copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)/sub 2/) were between 44 and 100% lower than on untreated control plants or plants treated with a more commonly used fungicide, mancozeb. The greatest reductions occurred on tomatoes, the least suitable host of the three for L. decemlineatamore » growth and survival.« less
  • The Colorado potato beetle is one of the most challenging agricultural pests to manage. It has shown a spectacular ability to adapt to a variety of solanaceaeous plants and variable climates during its global invasion, and, notably, to rapidly evolve insecticide resistance. To examine evidence of rapid evolutionary change, and to understand the genetic basis of herbivory and insecticide resistance, we tested for structural and functional genomic changes relative to other arthropod species using genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and community annotation. Two factors that might facilitate rapid evolutionary change include transposable elements, which comprise at least 17% of the genome andmore » are rapidly evolving compared to other Coleoptera, and high levels of nucleotide diversity in rapidly growing pest populations. Adaptations to plant feeding are evident in gene expansions and differential expression of digestive enzymes in gut tissues, as well as expansions of gustatory receptors for bitter tasting. Surprisingly, the suite of genes involved in insecticide resistance is similar to other beetles. Finally, duplications in the RNAi pathway might explain why Leptinotarsa decemlineata has high sensitivity to dsRNA. In conclusion, the L. decemlineata genome provides opportunities to investigate a broad range of phenotypes and to develop sustainable methods to control this widely successful pest.« less
  • Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as (/sup 3/H)choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelledmore » neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca/sup 2 +/ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca/sup 2 +/ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists.« less
  • Mean movement rates of 34 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) tagged with ultrasonic transmitters in Twin Lakes, Colorado, ranged from 1.1 m/min in the fall to 1.6 m/min in the summer. Movement rates between 0830 and 1130 were significantly higher than between 2230 and 0500 during spring, summer, and fall. During the fall, afternoon movements were significantly greater than night movements. It is likely that the lake trout of Twin Lakes will be least vulnerable to entrainment by pumping operations between 2230 and 0500 and most vulnerable between 0830 and 1130 during spring, summer, and fall. Seasonally, they will be leastmore » vulnerable in the winter and most vulnerable in the spring.« less