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Title: Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation

Abstract

Exposure time of Trypanosoma rhodesiense as short as 1 minute to ultraviolet (uv) light prevents the organisms from causing infection. Live trypanosome challenge of mice immunized with uv-irradiated trypanosomes results in sterile immunity. This allows a method for the induction of protective immunity to experimental trypanosomiasis which can be performed in most laboratories using uv germicidal lamps found in sterile hoods.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque
OSTI Identifier:
5296312
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.; (United States); Journal Volume: 30:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; TRYPANOSOMA; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; TRYPANOSOMIASIS; VACCINES; IMMUNITY; INFECTIVITY; MICE; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DISEASES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; MAMMALS; MASTIGOPHORA; PARASITES; PARASITIC DISEASES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES 560134* -- Radiation Effects on Microorganisms-- Vaccine Preparation & Other Applications-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Charoenvit, Y., and Campbell, G.H. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Charoenvit, Y., & Campbell, G.H. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. United States.
Charoenvit, Y., and Campbell, G.H. 1981. "Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5296312,
title = {Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma rhodesiense exposed to ultraviolet irradiation},
author = {Charoenvit, Y. and Campbell, G.H.},
abstractNote = {Exposure time of Trypanosoma rhodesiense as short as 1 minute to ultraviolet (uv) light prevents the organisms from causing infection. Live trypanosome challenge of mice immunized with uv-irradiated trypanosomes results in sterile immunity. This allows a method for the induction of protective immunity to experimental trypanosomiasis which can be performed in most laboratories using uv germicidal lamps found in sterile hoods.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 30:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month =
}
  • It was shown that irradiation (650 rad) of 7 inbred strains of mice did not block the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to transform from the long slender (LS) to the short stumpy (SS) form or alter the plateau in parasitemia. In addition, it was observed that significant differences in parasitemia levels, in the rate of transformation from the LS to the SS form, as well as in the survival times occurred between the irradiated C3HeB/FeJ and several of the other strains. These differences in the nonspecific ability to control parasitemia appeared to be characteristic for each inbred strain ofmore » mice. The resistant strains generally had lower parasitemia than the susceptible strains. However, it was also shown that there is not a one-to-one correlation between the innate ability of a mouse strain to control its initial parasitemia, and the strain's ability to clear the parasitemia or increase its survival time. It was therefore concluded that the hypothesis which states that the ability of an animal to increase nonspecifically the rate of transformation, and therefore to lower the parasitemia, allowing intact animals to respond immunologically and survive longer is either incorrect or incomplete. The results further show that the ability of mice to clear their initial parasitemia by an antibody response is not necessarily correlated with their survival time. Therefore, this study suggests that factors other than an antibody response and the nonspecific control of parasitemia are important in resistance.« less
  • The cellular bases of resistance to the African trypanosomes were examined in inbred mice. As part of these studies, reciprocal bone marrow cell transplants were performed between H-2 compatible mice which differ in relative resistance to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection. Relatively resistant C57BL/10 mice, intermediate A.By mice, and least resistant C3H.SW mice that were reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow cells displayed resistance and immunity characteristic of the homologous donor strain. When C57BL/10 mice were reconstituted with C3H.SW mouse bone marrow cells they retained the ability to produce antibodies to trypanosome surface antigen but the antibody titers weremore » significantly reduced. Control of parasitemia and mean survival time were reduced in these chimeras, but differed significantly from C3H.SW mice. A. By mice that received cells from C57BL/10 donors exhibited antibody responses and survival times similar to the C57BL/10 mice. Survival times of A.By mice given syngeneic cells or C3H.SW cells were the same, but the antibody responses of A.By mice given C3H.SW cells were lower than those of A.By mice given syngeneic cells. C3H.SW mice reconstituted with C57BL/10 bone marrow cells were capable of making antibodies and controlling parasitemia, in marked contrast to the absence of such responses in C3H.SW mice reconstituted with syngeneic cells. Survival times, however, were indistinguishable from those of C3H.SW mice given syngeneic cells. Thus, resistance to T.B. rhodesiense was shown for the first time to depend on donor bone marrow derived cells as well as upon radiation-resistant cells/factors associated with host genetic background. Also, parasite-specific IgM antibody responses seem to be regulated by a mechanism which does not depend on bone marrow derived cells alone, and the presence of such immune responses is not linked to survival time.« less
  • After mice became infected from small doses of Shigella flexneri var. newcastle, chemotherapy and immunization accelerated the elimination of bacteria from the internal organs of the animals. I such conditions immunization produced specific immunity. Exposure to 400 r suppressed the natural immunity and caused bacteraemia of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and suppressed resistance. Under these conditions chemotherapy and immunization still had a certain favorable effect on the animals. The mortality decreased, the formation of antibodies was enhanced, and bacteria were eliminated to a greater degree from the animals than in those animals which were infected and exposed to radiation butmore » were not treated and immunized. After exposure of mice to a radiation dose of 300 r, immunization and chemotherapy were more effective than after exposure to a radiation dose of 400 r. (auth)« less