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Title: Nonimaging solar energy concentrators (CPC's) with fully illuminated flat receivers: A viable alternative to flat-plate collectors

Abstract

Low-concentration, stationary, nonimaging concentrators (CPC's) with flat receivers illuminated on both sides are considered as viable alternatives to flat-plate solar collectors. Closed-form, analytic formulae are derived for the geometric characteristics of two concentrator types of greatest interest (i.e., stationary collectors for year-round energy delivery), which enable calculations of collectible energy without computer ray-tracing stimulations. The relative merits of these concentrators in terms of energy collection and production costs are assessed with respect to each other as well as to flat-plate collectors.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Applied Solar Calculations Unit, Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus 84990
OSTI Identifier:
5293454
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Sol. Energy Eng.; (United States); Journal Volume: 108:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; COMPOUND PARABOLIC CONCENTRATORS; DESIGN; CALCULATION METHODS; COST; EQUATIONS; FLAT PLATE COLLECTORS; GEOMETRY; SOLAR RECEIVERS; EQUIPMENT; MATHEMATICS; SOLAR COLLECTORS; SOLAR CONCENTRATORS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; 141000* - Solar Collectors & Concentrators

Citation Formats

Gordon, J.M. Nonimaging solar energy concentrators (CPC's) with fully illuminated flat receivers: A viable alternative to flat-plate collectors. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1115/1.3268101.
Gordon, J.M. Nonimaging solar energy concentrators (CPC's) with fully illuminated flat receivers: A viable alternative to flat-plate collectors. United States. doi:10.1115/1.3268101.
Gordon, J.M. Fri . "Nonimaging solar energy concentrators (CPC's) with fully illuminated flat receivers: A viable alternative to flat-plate collectors". United States. doi:10.1115/1.3268101.
@article{osti_5293454,
title = {Nonimaging solar energy concentrators (CPC's) with fully illuminated flat receivers: A viable alternative to flat-plate collectors},
author = {Gordon, J.M.},
abstractNote = {Low-concentration, stationary, nonimaging concentrators (CPC's) with flat receivers illuminated on both sides are considered as viable alternatives to flat-plate solar collectors. Closed-form, analytic formulae are derived for the geometric characteristics of two concentrator types of greatest interest (i.e., stationary collectors for year-round energy delivery), which enable calculations of collectible energy without computer ray-tracing stimulations. The relative merits of these concentrators in terms of energy collection and production costs are assessed with respect to each other as well as to flat-plate collectors.},
doi = {10.1115/1.3268101},
journal = {J. Sol. Energy Eng.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 108:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986}
}
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