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Title: Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

Abstract

Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cordis Corp, Miami, Fla, USA
OSTI Identifier:
5292166
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5292166
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Proc. - Electrochem. Soc.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80-4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARDIAC PACEMAKERS; PRIMARY BATTERIES; RELIABILITY; COPPER SULFIDES; IMPLANTS; LITHIUM COMPOUNDS; SAFETY; USES; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; CHALCOGENIDES; COPPER COMPOUNDS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS 250904* -- Energy Storage-- Batteries-- Other Applications; 550600 -- Medicine

Citation Formats

Cuesta, A.J., and Bump, D.D. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Cuesta, A.J., & Bump, D.D. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell. United States.
Cuesta, A.J., and Bump, D.D. Tue . "Lithium-cupric sulfide cell". United States.
@article{osti_5292166,
title = {Lithium-cupric sulfide cell},
author = {Cuesta, A.J. and Bump, D.D.},
abstractNote = {Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proc. - Electrochem. Soc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 80-4,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {1}
}