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Title: Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity

Abstract

Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California 92093
OSTI Identifier:
5286875
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Geophys. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 85:C5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; CALCIUM; PACIFIC OCEAN; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; ACIDIFICATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; TITRATION; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CARBONATES; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; METALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; 580500* - Oceanography- (1980-1989)

Citation Formats

Shiller, A.M., and Gieskes, J.M. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1029/JC085iC05p02719.
Shiller, A.M., & Gieskes, J.M. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity. United States. doi:10.1029/JC085iC05p02719.
Shiller, A.M., and Gieskes, J.M. 1980. "Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity". United States. doi:10.1029/JC085iC05p02719.
@article{osti_5286875,
title = {Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity},
author = {Shiller, A.M. and Gieskes, J.M.},
abstractNote = {Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.},
doi = {10.1029/JC085iC05p02719},
journal = {J. Geophys. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 85:C5,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 5
}
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