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Title: In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass

Abstract

Cells of Bacillus megaterium GW1 and Escherichia coli W7-M5 were specifically radiolabeled with 2,2{prime}-diamino (G-{sup 3}H) pimelic acid (({sup 3}H)DAP) as models of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Two experiments were conducted to study the in vivo metabolism of 2,2{prime}-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) in sheep. In experiment 1, cells of ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 were infused into the rumen of one sheep and the radiolabel was traced within microbial samples, digesta, and the whole animal. Bacterially bound ({sup 3}H)DAP was extensively metabolized, primarily (up to 70% after 8 h) via decarboxylation to ({sup 3}H)lysine by both ruminal protozoa and ruminal bacteria. Recovery of infused radiolabel in urine and feces was low (42% after 96 h) and perhaps indicative of further metabolism by the host animal. In experiment 2, ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 was infused into the rumens of three sheep and ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled E. coli W7-W5 was infused into the rumen of another sheep. The radioactivity contents of these mutant bacteria were insufficient to use as tracers, but the metabolism of DAP was monitored in the total, free, and peptidyl forms. Free DAP, as a proportion of total DPA in duodenal digesta, varied from 0 to 9.5%, whereas peptidylmore » DAP accounted for 8.3 to 99.2%.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. College of Wales (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5272300
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 57:6; Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BACILLUS; METABOLISM; BIOMASS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; ESCHERICHIA COLI; CELL CONSTITUENTS; CELL WALL; FECES; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; IN VIVO; MUTANTS; RUMINANTS; SHEEP; STOMACH; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; URINE; ANIMALS; BACTERIA; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL WASTES; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ENERGY SOURCES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; VERTEBRATES; WASTES; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Masson, H A, Denholm, A M, and Ling, J R. In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Masson, H A, Denholm, A M, & Ling, J R. In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass. United States.
Masson, H A, Denholm, A M, and Ling, J R. Sat . "In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass". United States.
@article{osti_5272300,
title = {In vivo metabolism of 2,2 prime -diaminopimelic acid from gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells by ruminal microorganisms and ruminants and its use as a marker of bacterial biomass},
author = {Masson, H A and Denholm, A M and Ling, J R},
abstractNote = {Cells of Bacillus megaterium GW1 and Escherichia coli W7-M5 were specifically radiolabeled with 2,2{prime}-diamino (G-{sup 3}H) pimelic acid (({sup 3}H)DAP) as models of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Two experiments were conducted to study the in vivo metabolism of 2,2{prime}-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) in sheep. In experiment 1, cells of ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 were infused into the rumen of one sheep and the radiolabel was traced within microbial samples, digesta, and the whole animal. Bacterially bound ({sup 3}H)DAP was extensively metabolized, primarily (up to 70% after 8 h) via decarboxylation to ({sup 3}H)lysine by both ruminal protozoa and ruminal bacteria. Recovery of infused radiolabel in urine and feces was low (42% after 96 h) and perhaps indicative of further metabolism by the host animal. In experiment 2, ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled B. megaterium GW1 was infused into the rumens of three sheep and ({sup 3}H)DAP-labeled E. coli W7-W5 was infused into the rumen of another sheep. The radioactivity contents of these mutant bacteria were insufficient to use as tracers, but the metabolism of DAP was monitored in the total, free, and peptidyl forms. Free DAP, as a proportion of total DPA in duodenal digesta, varied from 0 to 9.5%, whereas peptidyl DAP accounted for 8.3 to 99.2%.},
doi = {},
journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology; (United States)},
issn = {0099-2240},
number = ,
volume = 57:6,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {6}
}