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Title: Conquering Alaska's arctic drilling problems - 2. Drilling procedures

Abstract

A discussion is presented of ARCO's solutions to the drilling problems an oil company faces in developing an arctic oil and gas field. Outlined are the following topics: surface casing hole; direcitonal drilling; Fondu cement; intermediate casing; downsqueeze procedure; and, drilling to TD.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5269072
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5269072
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pet. Eng. Int.; (United States); Journal Volume: 53:7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ALASKA; NATURAL GAS WELLS; OIL WELLS; WELL DRILLING; DIRECTIONAL DRILLING; WELL CASINGS; DRILLING; FEDERAL REGION X; NORTH AMERICA; USA; WELLS 020300* -- Petroleum-- Drilling & Production; 030300 -- Natural Gas-- Drilling, Production, & Processing

Citation Formats

Moore, S.D. Conquering Alaska's arctic drilling problems - 2. Drilling procedures. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Moore, S.D. Conquering Alaska's arctic drilling problems - 2. Drilling procedures. United States.
Moore, S.D. Mon . "Conquering Alaska's arctic drilling problems - 2. Drilling procedures". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5269072,
title = {Conquering Alaska's arctic drilling problems - 2. Drilling procedures},
author = {Moore, S.D.},
abstractNote = {A discussion is presented of ARCO's solutions to the drilling problems an oil company faces in developing an arctic oil and gas field. Outlined are the following topics: surface casing hole; direcitonal drilling; Fondu cement; intermediate casing; downsqueeze procedure; and, drilling to TD.},
doi = {},
journal = {Pet. Eng. Int.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 53:7,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981},
month = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1981}
}
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