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Title: Nested case-control study of lung cancer among chemical workers

Abstract

A recent cohort mortality study of 19,608 male employees of a major Texas chemical production facility had suggested that they might be at higher risk of lung cancer compared with the male population of the United States or Texas but not with the male population of the five-county area in which they reside. An occupational exposure was a possible explanation for this pattern, and a nested case-control study was undertaken of the 308 lung cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1981. Two control groups, one a decedent and the other a ''living'' series, were individually matched to cases one-for-one. Interviews were conducted with subjects or their next of kin to collect information on smoking and other potential confounders. These data were combined with employee work history records and industrial hygiene data to form the basis of the analyses. Traditional stratification methods and conditional logistic regression were employed to examine for effect modification and to control confounding. Statistically significant, positive and negative associations were found for assignment to several work areas within the facility. Suggestive associations were observed for exposure to sulfur dioxide and heat. These and additional associations are discussed relative to evidence from other studies.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dow Chemical USA, Midland, MI
OSTI Identifier:
5267397
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Am. J. Epidemiol.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARCINOMAS; EPIDEMIOLOGY; LUNGS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; HEALTH HAZARDS; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; MORTALITY; OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES; PERSONNEL; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; TEXAS; VITAMIN A; BODY; CHALCOGENIDES; DISEASES; FEDERAL REGION VI; HAZARDS; INDUSTRY; NEOPLASMS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; USA; VITAMINS; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Bond, G G, Flores, G H, Shellenberger, R J, Cartmill, J B, Fishbeck, W A, and Cook, R R. Nested case-control study of lung cancer among chemical workers. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Bond, G G, Flores, G H, Shellenberger, R J, Cartmill, J B, Fishbeck, W A, & Cook, R R. Nested case-control study of lung cancer among chemical workers. United States.
Bond, G G, Flores, G H, Shellenberger, R J, Cartmill, J B, Fishbeck, W A, and Cook, R R. 1986. "Nested case-control study of lung cancer among chemical workers". United States.
@article{osti_5267397,
title = {Nested case-control study of lung cancer among chemical workers},
author = {Bond, G G and Flores, G H and Shellenberger, R J and Cartmill, J B and Fishbeck, W A and Cook, R R},
abstractNote = {A recent cohort mortality study of 19,608 male employees of a major Texas chemical production facility had suggested that they might be at higher risk of lung cancer compared with the male population of the United States or Texas but not with the male population of the five-county area in which they reside. An occupational exposure was a possible explanation for this pattern, and a nested case-control study was undertaken of the 308 lung cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1981. Two control groups, one a decedent and the other a ''living'' series, were individually matched to cases one-for-one. Interviews were conducted with subjects or their next of kin to collect information on smoking and other potential confounders. These data were combined with employee work history records and industrial hygiene data to form the basis of the analyses. Traditional stratification methods and conditional logistic regression were employed to examine for effect modification and to control confounding. Statistically significant, positive and negative associations were found for assignment to several work areas within the facility. Suggestive associations were observed for exposure to sulfur dioxide and heat. These and additional associations are discussed relative to evidence from other studies.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5267397}, journal = {Am. J. Epidemiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {1986},
month = {7}
}