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Title: Folding models for elastic and inelastic scattering

Abstract

The most widely used models are the optical model potential (OMP) for elastic scattering, and its generalization to non-spherical shapes, the deformed optical model potential (DOMP) for inelastic scattering. These models are simple and phenomenological; their parameters are adjusted so as to reproduce empirical data. Nonetheless, there are certain, not always well-defined, constraints to be imposed. The potential shapes and their parameter values must be reasonable and should vary in a smooth and systematic way with the masses of the colliding nuclei and their energy. One way of satisfying these constraints, without going back to a much more fundamental theory, is through the use of folding models. The basic justification for using potentials of the Woods-Saxon shape for nucleon-nucleus scattering, for example, is our knowledge that a nuclear density distribution is more-or-less constant in the nuclear interior with a diffuse surface. When this is folded with a short-range nucleon-nucleon interaction, the result is a similar shape with a more diffuse surface. Folding procedures allow us to incorporate many aspects of nuclear structure (although the nuclear size is one of the most important), as well as theoretical ideas about the effective interaction of two nucleons within nuclear matter. It also providesmore » us with a means of linking information obtained from nuclear (hadronic) interactions with that from other sources, as well as correlating that from the use of different hadronic probes. Folding model potentials, single-folded potentials, and the double-folding model including applications to heavy-ion scattering are discussed. (WHK)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5262833
Report Number(s):
CONF-820663-2
ON: DE82017426; TRN: 82-017211
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International summer school on heavy ion collisions, La Rabida, Huelva, Spain, 7 Jun 1982; Other Information: Portions of document are illegible
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; ELASTIC SCATTERING; NUCLEAR MODELS; HEAVY ION REACTIONS; INELASTIC SCATTERING; NUCLEON REACTIONS; FESHBACH-WEISSKOPF MODEL; NUCLEAR POTENTIAL; NUCLEON-NUCLEON POTENTIAL; OPTICAL MODELS; WAVE FUNCTIONS; BARYON REACTIONS; CHARGED-PARTICLE REACTIONS; FUNCTIONS; HADRON REACTIONS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; POTENTIALS; SCATTERING; 653003* - Nuclear Theory- Nuclear Reactions & Scattering

Citation Formats

Satchler, G R. Folding models for elastic and inelastic scattering. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Satchler, G R. Folding models for elastic and inelastic scattering. United States.
Satchler, G R. Fri . "Folding models for elastic and inelastic scattering". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5262833.
@article{osti_5262833,
title = {Folding models for elastic and inelastic scattering},
author = {Satchler, G R},
abstractNote = {The most widely used models are the optical model potential (OMP) for elastic scattering, and its generalization to non-spherical shapes, the deformed optical model potential (DOMP) for inelastic scattering. These models are simple and phenomenological; their parameters are adjusted so as to reproduce empirical data. Nonetheless, there are certain, not always well-defined, constraints to be imposed. The potential shapes and their parameter values must be reasonable and should vary in a smooth and systematic way with the masses of the colliding nuclei and their energy. One way of satisfying these constraints, without going back to a much more fundamental theory, is through the use of folding models. The basic justification for using potentials of the Woods-Saxon shape for nucleon-nucleus scattering, for example, is our knowledge that a nuclear density distribution is more-or-less constant in the nuclear interior with a diffuse surface. When this is folded with a short-range nucleon-nucleon interaction, the result is a similar shape with a more diffuse surface. Folding procedures allow us to incorporate many aspects of nuclear structure (although the nuclear size is one of the most important), as well as theoretical ideas about the effective interaction of two nucleons within nuclear matter. It also provides us with a means of linking information obtained from nuclear (hadronic) interactions with that from other sources, as well as correlating that from the use of different hadronic probes. Folding model potentials, single-folded potentials, and the double-folding model including applications to heavy-ion scattering are discussed. (WHK)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1982},
month = {1}
}

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