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Title: Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital

Abstract

Twenty-seven dogs with lead poisoning were admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital from July, 1963, to April, 1975. The major source of the lead was paint. A common history was ingestion of plaster or paint scrapings during room renovation. Most of the dogs were less than 1 year old and had clinical signs referable to the gastrointestinal or the nervous system, or both. The gastrointestinal signs, in order of frequency, were vomiting, anorexia, tender abdomen, diarrhea, and constipation. The neurologic signs, in order of frequency, were hysteria, convulsions, ataxia, blindness, and mydriasis. The finding of many nucleated erythrocytes without severe anemia was nearly pathognomonic for lead poisoning. Of 14 affected dogs subjected to abdominal radiography, 9 had evidence of ingested radiopaque material. A mean blood lead concentration of 18.8 ..mu..g/100 ml, with a range of 0 to 50 ..mu..g/100 ml, was found for 26 dogs that were hospitalized for problems unrelated to lead poisoning. Of the 27 dogs with lead poisoning, 22 had their blood analyzed for lead. This group had blood lead values ranging from 40 to 530 ..mu..g/100 ml. Seven of the affected dogs were monitored throughout their period of treatment with calcium ethylene-diaminetetraacetate. The concentrationmore » of lead in the blood decreased quickly after the initiation and treatment but leveled off after 2 or 3 days. The initial rapid phase probably corresponded to the removal of weakly bound or extracellular lead, whereas the slow phase probably corresponded to strongly bound or intracellular lead. 22 references.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
OSTI Identifier:
5261440
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5261440
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc.; (United States); Journal Volume: 168:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DOGS; INJURIES; LEAD; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BLOOD; CALCIUM; CHELATING AGENTS; EDTA; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; PENNSYLVANIA; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; AMINO ACIDS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; DATA; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION III; INFORMATION; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; METALS; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; USA; VERTEBRATES 560305* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Vertebrates-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Kowalczyk, D.F. Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital. United States: N. p., 1976. Web.
Kowalczyk, D.F. Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital. United States.
Kowalczyk, D.F. Mon . "Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital". United States.
@article{osti_5261440,
title = {Lead poisoning in dogs at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital},
author = {Kowalczyk, D.F.},
abstractNote = {Twenty-seven dogs with lead poisoning were admitted to the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital from July, 1963, to April, 1975. The major source of the lead was paint. A common history was ingestion of plaster or paint scrapings during room renovation. Most of the dogs were less than 1 year old and had clinical signs referable to the gastrointestinal or the nervous system, or both. The gastrointestinal signs, in order of frequency, were vomiting, anorexia, tender abdomen, diarrhea, and constipation. The neurologic signs, in order of frequency, were hysteria, convulsions, ataxia, blindness, and mydriasis. The finding of many nucleated erythrocytes without severe anemia was nearly pathognomonic for lead poisoning. Of 14 affected dogs subjected to abdominal radiography, 9 had evidence of ingested radiopaque material. A mean blood lead concentration of 18.8 ..mu..g/100 ml, with a range of 0 to 50 ..mu..g/100 ml, was found for 26 dogs that were hospitalized for problems unrelated to lead poisoning. Of the 27 dogs with lead poisoning, 22 had their blood analyzed for lead. This group had blood lead values ranging from 40 to 530 ..mu..g/100 ml. Seven of the affected dogs were monitored throughout their period of treatment with calcium ethylene-diaminetetraacetate. The concentration of lead in the blood decreased quickly after the initiation and treatment but leveled off after 2 or 3 days. The initial rapid phase probably corresponded to the removal of weakly bound or extracellular lead, whereas the slow phase probably corresponded to strongly bound or intracellular lead. 22 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 168:5,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1976},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1976}
}