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Title: A new algebra core for the minimal form' problem

Abstract

The demands of large-scale algebraic computation have led to the development of many new algorithms for manipulating algebraic objects in computer algebra systems. For instance, parallel versions of many important algorithms have been discovered. Simultaneously, more effective symbolic representations of algebraic objects have been sought. Also, while some clever techniques have been found for improving the speed of the algebraic simplification process, little attention has been given to the issue of restructuring expressions, or transforming them into minimal forms.'' By minimal form,'' we mean that form of an expression that involves a minimum number of operations. In a companion paper, we introduce some new algorithms that are very effective at finding minimal forms of expressions. These algorithms require algebraic and combinatorial machinery that is not readily available in most algebra systems. In this paper we describe a new algebra core that begins to provide the necessary capabilities.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (Institute for Defense Analyses, Princeton, NJ (United States). Center for Communications Research)
  2. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5254684
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-109226; CONF-920760-4
ON: DE92011966
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on symbolic and algebraic computation, Berkeley, CA (United States), 27-29 Jul 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; PROGRAMMING; ALGEBRA; ALGORITHMS; PARALLEL PROCESSING; MATHEMATICAL LOGIC; MATHEMATICS; 990200* - Mathematics & Computers

Citation Formats

Purtill, M.R., Oliveira, J.S., and Cook, G.O. Jr. A new algebra core for the minimal form' problem. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Purtill, M.R., Oliveira, J.S., & Cook, G.O. Jr. A new algebra core for the minimal form' problem. United States.
Purtill, M.R., Oliveira, J.S., and Cook, G.O. Jr. Fri . "A new algebra core for the minimal form' problem". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5254684,
title = {A new algebra core for the minimal form' problem},
author = {Purtill, M.R. and Oliveira, J.S. and Cook, G.O. Jr.},
abstractNote = {The demands of large-scale algebraic computation have led to the development of many new algorithms for manipulating algebraic objects in computer algebra systems. For instance, parallel versions of many important algorithms have been discovered. Simultaneously, more effective symbolic representations of algebraic objects have been sought. Also, while some clever techniques have been found for improving the speed of the algebraic simplification process, little attention has been given to the issue of restructuring expressions, or transforming them into minimal forms.'' By minimal form,'' we mean that form of an expression that involves a minimum number of operations. In a companion paper, we introduce some new algorithms that are very effective at finding minimal forms of expressions. These algorithms require algebraic and combinatorial machinery that is not readily available in most algebra systems. In this paper we describe a new algebra core that begins to provide the necessary capabilities.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Fri Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}

Conference:
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