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Title: Contribution of polymers to classical primary insulation of distribution system

Abstract

Insulation composites used on present distribution lines frequently consist of several types of materials such as wood, porcelain, polymers and fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRP) connected in series. A study included the laboratory determination of the critical flashover voltage (CFO) of 17 single component and 90 combinations of two components were conducted. The acquired data were used to develop methods of predicting CFO levels of various multiple series electrical insulations. This paper illustrates the results and analyses of the classical primary insulation (porcelain), and of the modern-day insulation of polymers. It also presents the result of whether polymers may add or supplement insulation strength to the two dielectric combination using statistical methods. The paper also presents advantages and guidelines for the use of polymers to either replace or complement porcelain. This may help optimize the choice of dielectrics on distribution lines.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. King Fahd Univ., Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Electrical Engineering Dept.
  2. Columbia Coll., MO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
524639
Report Number(s):
CONF-960614-
ISBN 0-7803-3531-7; TRN: IM9740%%113
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1996 IEEE international symposium on electrical insulation, Montreal (Canada), 16-19 Jun 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Conference record of the 1996 IEEE international symposium on electrical insulation. Volume 1; PB: 475 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POLYMERS; PORCELAIN; ELECTRICAL INSULATORS; POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; FLASHOVER

Citation Formats

Shwehdi, M.H., and Al-Rawi, A.. Contribution of polymers to classical primary insulation of distribution system. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Shwehdi, M.H., & Al-Rawi, A.. Contribution of polymers to classical primary insulation of distribution system. United States.
Shwehdi, M.H., and Al-Rawi, A.. 1996. "Contribution of polymers to classical primary insulation of distribution system". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_524639,
title = {Contribution of polymers to classical primary insulation of distribution system},
author = {Shwehdi, M.H. and Al-Rawi, A.},
abstractNote = {Insulation composites used on present distribution lines frequently consist of several types of materials such as wood, porcelain, polymers and fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRP) connected in series. A study included the laboratory determination of the critical flashover voltage (CFO) of 17 single component and 90 combinations of two components were conducted. The acquired data were used to develop methods of predicting CFO levels of various multiple series electrical insulations. This paper illustrates the results and analyses of the classical primary insulation (porcelain), and of the modern-day insulation of polymers. It also presents the result of whether polymers may add or supplement insulation strength to the two dielectric combination using statistical methods. The paper also presents advantages and guidelines for the use of polymers to either replace or complement porcelain. This may help optimize the choice of dielectrics on distribution lines.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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