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Title: Expanded use of fossil fuels by the U. S. and the global carbon dioxide problem

Abstract

Continued combustion of fossil fuels contributes to a steady increase of carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Projecting present increases in rates of fossil-fuel utilization, a doubling of CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere may be expected within the next 75 years. Based on preliminary calculations, coal utilization by the U.S. to the year 2020 accounts for between 9 and 14% of the increase in CO/sub 2/ concentration. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere absorbs infrared radiation, causing an increase in the surface temperature of the earth. The most recent climatic models indicate that each doubling in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration will result in a temperature increase of approximately 3 +- 1/sup 0/C, depending on the model used. Changes in average rates of precipitation and evaporation may follow, leading to higher probabilities of drought in the mid-latitudes (including the (U.S.). Manabe and Wetherald (J. Atmos. Sci., 32: 3-15 (1975)) have estimated the temperature increase at high latitudes to be three times the increase in the global average surface temperature. Large-scale melting of the polar ice caps and a subsequent increase in the surface area of the oceans may follow on a timetable that is not yet clear. The distribution of vegetationmore » and agricultural activities can be expected to change in response to the temperature increase and associated with the analysis of the CO/sub 2//climate problem mandate the initiation of an immediate global-scale interdisciplinary research effort to determine more clearly the components and connections of the problem and to develop strategies for reducing the impacts, i.e., contingency plans that could be helpful regardless of impact details which remain to be determined. 26 references.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN
OSTI Identifier:
5239679
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Environ. Manage.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CARBON DIOXIDE; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; CLIMATES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; FOSSIL FUELS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COMBUSTION; FORECASTING; INFRARED RADIATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RECOMMENDATIONS; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS; USA; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDATION; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POWER PLANTS; RADIATIONS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; 500100* - Environment, Atmospheric- Basic Studies- (-1989); 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects; 294000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Fossil Fuels; 290300 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Emanuel, W R, Olson, J S, and Killough, G G. Expanded use of fossil fuels by the U. S. and the global carbon dioxide problem. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Emanuel, W R, Olson, J S, & Killough, G G. Expanded use of fossil fuels by the U. S. and the global carbon dioxide problem. United States.
Emanuel, W R, Olson, J S, and Killough, G G. Tue . "Expanded use of fossil fuels by the U. S. and the global carbon dioxide problem". United States.
@article{osti_5239679,
title = {Expanded use of fossil fuels by the U. S. and the global carbon dioxide problem},
author = {Emanuel, W R and Olson, J S and Killough, G G},
abstractNote = {Continued combustion of fossil fuels contributes to a steady increase of carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Projecting present increases in rates of fossil-fuel utilization, a doubling of CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere may be expected within the next 75 years. Based on preliminary calculations, coal utilization by the U.S. to the year 2020 accounts for between 9 and 14% of the increase in CO/sub 2/ concentration. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere absorbs infrared radiation, causing an increase in the surface temperature of the earth. The most recent climatic models indicate that each doubling in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration will result in a temperature increase of approximately 3 +- 1/sup 0/C, depending on the model used. Changes in average rates of precipitation and evaporation may follow, leading to higher probabilities of drought in the mid-latitudes (including the (U.S.). Manabe and Wetherald (J. Atmos. Sci., 32: 3-15 (1975)) have estimated the temperature increase at high latitudes to be three times the increase in the global average surface temperature. Large-scale melting of the polar ice caps and a subsequent increase in the surface area of the oceans may follow on a timetable that is not yet clear. The distribution of vegetation and agricultural activities can be expected to change in response to the temperature increase and associated with the analysis of the CO/sub 2//climate problem mandate the initiation of an immediate global-scale interdisciplinary research effort to determine more clearly the components and connections of the problem and to develop strategies for reducing the impacts, i.e., contingency plans that could be helpful regardless of impact details which remain to be determined. 26 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Environ. Manage.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 10:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {1}
}