skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: 1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna

Abstract

This dissertation is concerned with two aspects of detecting gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources. First, the data collection and analysis for a coincidence experiment conducted in 1986 using gravitational wave detectors operated by Stanford University, the university of Rome, and Louisiana State University are described. This experiment was important for several reasons: (1) it was the first coincidence experiment between cryogenic resonant-mass detectors; (2) it improved the observational upper limit on the flux of impulsive gravitational waves that impinge upon the earth; and (3) it lead to the development of a data analysis method for converting the experimental results into an astrophysically meaningful limit on the flux of gravitational radiation from impulsive events. Second, the development of a superconducting thin-film motion transducer intended for use on an ultra-low temperature detector now under construction is described. The sensitivity goal is h = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}20}. To reach this goal the physical temperature of the detector will be lowered to 40 mK, a lower-noise SQUID amplifier will be used, and a new motion transducer will be developed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5231968
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph.D)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AMPLIFIERS; NOISE; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; DESIGN; SQUID DEVICES; TRANSDUCERS; SUPERCONDUCTING FILMS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; FILMS; FLUXMETERS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT; RADIATION DETECTORS; SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES; 440800* - Miscellaneous Instrumentation- (1990-); 657003 - Theoretical & Mathematical Physics- Relativity & Gravitation

Citation Formats

Stevenson, T R. 1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Stevenson, T R. 1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna. United States.
Stevenson, T R. Tue . "1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna". United States.
@article{osti_5231968,
title = {1. First coincidence experiments between cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational-wave detectors. 2. Development of a thin-film superconducting transducer for a gravitational-wave antenna},
author = {Stevenson, T R},
abstractNote = {This dissertation is concerned with two aspects of detecting gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources. First, the data collection and analysis for a coincidence experiment conducted in 1986 using gravitational wave detectors operated by Stanford University, the university of Rome, and Louisiana State University are described. This experiment was important for several reasons: (1) it was the first coincidence experiment between cryogenic resonant-mass detectors; (2) it improved the observational upper limit on the flux of impulsive gravitational waves that impinge upon the earth; and (3) it lead to the development of a data analysis method for converting the experimental results into an astrophysically meaningful limit on the flux of gravitational radiation from impulsive events. Second, the development of a superconducting thin-film motion transducer intended for use on an ultra-low temperature detector now under construction is described. The sensitivity goal is h = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}20}. To reach this goal the physical temperature of the detector will be lowered to 40 mK, a lower-noise SQUID amplifier will be used, and a new motion transducer will be developed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {1}
}

Miscellaneous:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item.

Save / Share: