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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio

Abstract

In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitismore » than comparisons.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5227347
Report Number(s):
PB-91-212423/XAB; HETA--87-392-2099
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ASBESTOS; HEALTH HAZARDS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INHALATION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; OHIO; PERSONNEL; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; FEDERAL REGION V; HAZARDS; INTAKE; MEDICINE; NORTH AMERICA; USA 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Not Available. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Not Available. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio. United States.
Not Available. 1991. "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5227347,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitis than comparisons.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:
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