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Title: Design of a 10. 6 micron laser radar transmitter

Abstract

The analysis and design of a 10.6 micron laser radar transmitter is reviewed. This laser radar will serve as a testbed for the development of electrooptic componentry and image recognition software. A number of design problems are defined by the performance constraints. These design problems are analyzed with first-principles modeling and a set of expected performance attributes is determined. The resulting design is discussed in detail and, where possible, commercially available hardware is identified for use in the laser radar design. 10 refs., 9 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5226617
Report Number(s):
SAND-86-0028
ON: DE87000675
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CARBON DIOXIDE LASERS; RADAR; DESIGN; OPTICAL SYSTEMS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; GAS LASERS; LASERS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RANGE FINDERS; TESTING; 420300* - Engineering- Lasers- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Williams, W.D.. Design of a 10. 6 micron laser radar transmitter. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Williams, W.D.. Design of a 10. 6 micron laser radar transmitter. United States.
Williams, W.D.. 1986. "Design of a 10. 6 micron laser radar transmitter". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5226617,
title = {Design of a 10. 6 micron laser radar transmitter},
author = {Williams, W.D.},
abstractNote = {The analysis and design of a 10.6 micron laser radar transmitter is reviewed. This laser radar will serve as a testbed for the development of electrooptic componentry and image recognition software. A number of design problems are defined by the performance constraints. These design problems are analyzed with first-principles modeling and a set of expected performance attributes is determined. The resulting design is discussed in detail and, where possible, commercially available hardware is identified for use in the laser radar design. 10 refs., 9 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:
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