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Title: Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate

Abstract

The ciliated protozoan Paramecium was used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nickel particles. The biological response of these eukaryotic cells to pure nickel powder and iron-nickel powder was assayed and compared to the effect of the inorganic carcinogen nickel subsulfide. Cytotoxicity was determined by the percent survival of treated cells. Genotoxicity was indicated by significant increases in the fraction of nonviable offspring (presumed index of lethal mutations) found after self-fertilization (autogamy) in parents from the nickel-treated versus neutral control groups. The cells were exposed to the dusts and the biological effects determined. Only the nickel subsulfide consistently showed a significant increase in offspring lethality.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie
OSTI Identifier:
5217332
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Mutagen.; (United States); Journal Volume: 8:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; NICKEL; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; NICKEL SULFIDES; PARAMECIUM; MUTATION FREQUENCY; DUSTS; IRON COMPOUNDS; LETHAL MUTATIONS; MUTAGEN SCREENING; ANIMALS; CHALCOGENIDES; CILIATA; ELEMENTS; INVERTEBRATES; METALS; MICROORGANISMS; MUTATIONS; NICKEL COMPOUNDS; PROTOZOA; SCREENING; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 560302* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Microorganisms- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Smith-Sonneborn, J., Leibovitz, B., Donathan, R., and Fisher, G.L.. Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1002/em.2860080412.
Smith-Sonneborn, J., Leibovitz, B., Donathan, R., & Fisher, G.L.. Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate. United States. doi:10.1002/em.2860080412.
Smith-Sonneborn, J., Leibovitz, B., Donathan, R., and Fisher, G.L.. 1986. "Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate". United States. doi:10.1002/em.2860080412.
@article{osti_5217332,
title = {Bioassay of environmental nickel dusts in a particle feeding ciliate},
author = {Smith-Sonneborn, J. and Leibovitz, B. and Donathan, R. and Fisher, G.L.},
abstractNote = {The ciliated protozoan Paramecium was used to quantitate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nickel particles. The biological response of these eukaryotic cells to pure nickel powder and iron-nickel powder was assayed and compared to the effect of the inorganic carcinogen nickel subsulfide. Cytotoxicity was determined by the percent survival of treated cells. Genotoxicity was indicated by significant increases in the fraction of nonviable offspring (presumed index of lethal mutations) found after self-fertilization (autogamy) in parents from the nickel-treated versus neutral control groups. The cells were exposed to the dusts and the biological effects determined. Only the nickel subsulfide consistently showed a significant increase in offspring lethality.},
doi = {10.1002/em.2860080412},
journal = {Environ. Mutagen.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 8:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}
  • The use of the established mutagenesis assay in Paramecium as a prescreen for hazardous environmental particles is described. Since these protozoans ingest particles of the size respired by animals and man, the biological effects of the respirable fraction of fly ash particles were monitored in particle-feeding eukaryotic cells. Fly ash from coal combustion was utilized for these studies and was found to be mutagenic. The effects of physical and chemical treatment of the particle mutagenicity provided evidence for both heat-stable, heat-labile and acid extractable mutagenic agents.
  • The use of the established mutagenesis assay in Paramecium as a prescreen for hazardous environmental particles is described. Since these protozoans ingest particles of the size respired by animals and man, the biological effects of the respirable fraction of fly ash particles were monitored in particle-feeding eukaryotic cells. Fly ash from coal combustion was utilized for these studies and was found to be mutagenic. The effects of physical and chemical treatment of the particle mutagenicity provided evidence for both heat-stable, heat-labile and acid extractable mutagenic agents.
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