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Title: Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners]

Abstract

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5212047
Report Number(s):
DOE/EIA-0544
ON: DE92000614
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; COMPILED DATA; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ECONOMICS; FORECASTING; GEOPRESSURED SYSTEMS; GEOTHERMAL INDUSTRY; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; GEYSERS GEOTHERMAL FIELD; HAWAII; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; HOT-DRY-ROCK SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; INTERLABORATORY COMPARISONS; LABORATORIES; MAGMA; MARKET; POWER SUPPLIES; PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT; REGULATIONS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; WEST COAST; DATA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; ENERGY SYSTEMS; EQUIPMENT; FEDERAL REGION IX; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; INDUSTRY; INFORMATION; LAWS; NATIONAL ENERGY ACT; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; POWER PLANTS; RESOURCES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; USA; Geothermal Legacy; 150500* - Geothermal Energy- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 150100 - Geothermal Energy- Resources & Availability; 150800 - Geothermal Power Plants; 580000 - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Not Available. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners]. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2172/5212047.
Not Available. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners]. United States. doi:10.2172/5212047.
Not Available. Sun . "Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners]". United States. doi:10.2172/5212047. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5212047.
@article{osti_5212047,
title = {Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners]},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.},
doi = {10.2172/5212047},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F andmore » 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.« less
  • Studies of Lualualei Valley, Oahu have been conducted to determine whether a thermal anomaly exists in the area and, if so, to identify sites at which subsurface techniques should be utilized to characterize the resource. Geologic mapping identifies several caldera and rift zone structures in the Valley and provides a tentative outline of their boundaries. Clay mineralogy studies indicate that minor geothermal alteration of near-surface rocks has occurred at some period in the history of the area. Schlumberger resistivity soundings indicate the presence of a low resistivity layer beneath the valley floor, which has been tentatively attributed to warm water-saturatedmore » basalt. Soil and groundwater chemistry studies outline several geochemical anomalies around the perimeter and within the inferred caldera boundaries. The observed anomalies strongly suggest a subsurface heat source. Recommendations for further exploratory work to confirm the presence of a geothermal reservoir include more intensive surveys in a few selected areas of the valley as well as the drilling of at least three shallow (1000-m) holes for subsurface geochemical, geological and geophysical studies.« less
  • Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost formore » heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.« less
  • This List is composed solely of US companies with major offices within the United States. All of the companies listed are involved in selling geothermally related goods and services internationally, or have the proven capability to do so. Each specific listing includes the company name, the name or title of the key contact person, address, telephone and if available a facsimile machine or telex number.