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Title: Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report

Abstract

Previous research on other sites showed that 15 tons/A of dried sewage sludge followed by subsoiling is sufficient to promote rapid growth of pines and sweetgum on borrow pits. During the past year, data have been obtained from this experiment showing that 30 tons/A of sewage sludge, well incorporated and followed by subsoiling, will promote very rapid first-year growth of green ash, yellow poplar, sycamore, and sawtooth oak. Loblolly pine and sweetgum also grew well as in previous studies. In most cases, seedlings of these species grew significantly faster with sewage sludge than with 1000 lbs./Aof 10-10-10 fertilizer and 2 tons/A of lime. Yellow poplar and sycamore grew the faster of all species, attaining heights during the first growing season of 134 and 209 cms, respectively. Sweetgum, green ash, and sawtooth oak all attained heights over 100 cms.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Forest Service, Athens, GA (USA). Inst. for Mycorrhizal Research and Development
OSTI Identifier:
5211915
Report Number(s):
DOE/SR/00870-38
ON: DE84008199
DOE Contract Number:
AI09-76SR00870
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FERTILIZERS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; OAKS; GROWTH; POPLARS; SEWAGE SLUDGE; SYCAMORES; MYCORRHIZAS; SEEDLINGS; PLANTS; SEWAGE; SLUDGES; TREES; WASTES; 553000* - Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Berry, C.R. Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Berry, C.R. Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report. United States.
Berry, C.R. 1984. "Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5211915,
title = {Feasibility of growing hardwood species on a borrow pit amended with either fertilizer and lime or sewage sludge. Progress report},
author = {Berry, C.R.},
abstractNote = {Previous research on other sites showed that 15 tons/A of dried sewage sludge followed by subsoiling is sufficient to promote rapid growth of pines and sweetgum on borrow pits. During the past year, data have been obtained from this experiment showing that 30 tons/A of sewage sludge, well incorporated and followed by subsoiling, will promote very rapid first-year growth of green ash, yellow poplar, sycamore, and sawtooth oak. Loblolly pine and sweetgum also grew well as in previous studies. In most cases, seedlings of these species grew significantly faster with sewage sludge than with 1000 lbs./Aof 10-10-10 fertilizer and 2 tons/A of lime. Yellow poplar and sycamore grew the faster of all species, attaining heights during the first growing season of 134 and 209 cms, respectively. Sweetgum, green ash, and sawtooth oak all attained heights over 100 cms.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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  • Progress is reported in the development of a technology to utilize /sup 137/Cs, a nuclear power plant by-product, as a ..gamma.. source for the treatment of sewage sludge for use as a fertilizer or animal feed supplement. Results are reported from studies on the radiosensitivity of Escherichia coli and Salmonella in sewage sludge; the effects of ammonia on the survival of viruses in sludges; heat inactivation rates for bacteria in sludges; the combined effects of heat and radiation on odor from sludge; and the cost advantages of irradiation over heat treatment of sewage sludge. Animal studies demonstrated the nutritional advantagesmore » of the addition of sludge to animal feeds and plant studies demonstrated the beneficial effects on plant growth of the use of sludge as fertilizer.« less
  • This report describes the work on the Waste Resources Utilization Program for the quarter ending March 31, 1976. The purpose of this program is to develop technologies to utilize a /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. source to modify sewage sludge for safe application as a fertilizer or an animal feed supplement. Results are reported from studies in microbiology, virology, and physical-chemical studies. Determinations were made of inactivation rates for Salmonella species, coliforms, and fecal strep in sewage sludge when radiation and thermoradiation were applied while bubbling oxygen through the sludge. Virology studies were continued investigating virucidal characteristics of anaerobically digested sludge. Anothermore » area of study was the dewatering of sewage sludge to reduce the drying time of the sewage sludge in the drying beds. A centrifuge was also installed to dewater treated sludge to approximately 30 percent solids. (auth)« less
  • Five-year-old loblolly, shortleaf, and Virginia pines growing on sites initially planted with 11960 seedlings/ha on plots amended with 34,000 kg/ha of dried sewage sludge or with 896 kg/ha of 10-10-10 inorganic fertilizer and 1,417 kg/ha of CaO, were felled, separated into stem and branches plus foliage, and sampled, to determine relative amounts of wood, bark, and foliage. On plots amended with sewage sludge, Virginia pine produced significantly more total tree biomass than the other species, and shortleaf produced significantly less. Regardless of fertility treatment, less than half of the total tree biomass for shortleaf and loblolly consisted of branches, butmore » dry weight of branches for Virginia pine was twice that of the main stem. In terms of biomass composition, trees growing on plots amended with sewage sludge averaged about 8 percent more wood as a percentage of total tree weight and proportionately less foliage than trees on plots amended with inorganic fertilizer. Regression equations based on independent variables of stem diameter at ground line and total height were developed to estimate total tree dry biomass. Estimated stand biomass was more than three times greater on the sludge plots than on fertilizer plots.« less
  • The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of sewage sludge as fertilizer. References study the effects of municipal sewage sludge on vegetation such as maize, beans, roadside plant life, and hardwood trees. Sewage sludge used as fertilizer to reclaim mined land is explored. Public attitudes are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 230 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)
  • Experiments conducted in the greenhouse compared the growth and nutrient and heavy metal uptake in two clones of hybrid poplar grown in soil amended with nitrogen fertilizer or sewage sludge. In addition, poplar responses to weed competition and to rooting prior to planting were investigated. Both fertilizer and sludge application increased poplar stem biomass. Weeds reduced poplar biomass. The large difference in root biomass of the two poplar clones may account for different effects weed and sludge application had on nutrient and heavy metal uptake in each clone. The relatively small root biomass of I-45/51 increased with increasing sludge application,more » as did the uptake of nutrients and heavy metals. The relatively large root biomass of clone NE-510 was reduced when weeds were present, as was nutrient and heavy metal uptake. Other results suggest that poplars with low root-to-stem ratios may be most affected by weed competition, especially after their first year, and that nitrogen fertilization may alleviate effects of weeds on their growth. Poplars grown in sludge-amended soil did not accumulate more of any nutrient or heavy metal studied compared to those grown in nitrogen-fertilized soil. 17 refs., 5 figs., 57 tabs.« less