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Title: Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report

Abstract

Health hazards associated with the use of benzalkonium chlorides (BAC) are reviewed. Benzalkonium chloride is extensively used as a cationic disinfectant. It is found in a great many over-the-counter and prescription eye products, disinfectants, shampoos, and deodorants, and is used in concentrations that range from 0.001 to 0.01% in eyedrops, up to 2.5% in concentrated liquid disinfectants. Solutions of 0.03 to 0.04% BAC may cause temporary eye irritation in humans but are unlikely to cause any skin response except in persons allergic to quaternary ammonium compounds. Inhalation of a vaporized 10% solution of BAC produced a bronchospasmodic reaction in a previously sensitized individual. At present no other human health effects from BAC have been documented or inferred from exposure to such dilute concentrations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5210900
Report Number(s):
BNL-34209
ON: DE84008058
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH00016
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DETERGENTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; HEALTH HAZARDS; QUATERNARY COMPOUNDS; DISINFECTANTS; FUNGICIDES; PERSONNEL; WORKING CONDITIONS; ADDITIVES; AMINES; AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS; EMULSIFIERS; GERMICIDES; HAZARDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PESTICIDES; SURFACTANTS; WETTING AGENTS; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 560305 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Bernholc, N.M. Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Bernholc, N.M. Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report. United States.
Bernholc, N.M. Sun . "Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5210900,
title = {Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report},
author = {Bernholc, N.M.},
abstractNote = {Health hazards associated with the use of benzalkonium chlorides (BAC) are reviewed. Benzalkonium chloride is extensively used as a cationic disinfectant. It is found in a great many over-the-counter and prescription eye products, disinfectants, shampoos, and deodorants, and is used in concentrations that range from 0.001 to 0.01% in eyedrops, up to 2.5% in concentrated liquid disinfectants. Solutions of 0.03 to 0.04% BAC may cause temporary eye irritation in humans but are unlikely to cause any skin response except in persons allergic to quaternary ammonium compounds. Inhalation of a vaporized 10% solution of BAC produced a bronchospasmodic reaction in a previously sensitized individual. At present no other human health effects from BAC have been documented or inferred from exposure to such dilute concentrations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}

Technical Report:
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