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Title: Mutagenicity and toxicity of treated aqueous effluents from coal conversion processes

Abstract

Coal gasification and hydrocarbonization wastewaters were treated in a series of bench-scale unit operations representative of a conceptual treatment process. Ammonia stripping, biological oxidation, ozonation and carbon adsorption were performed with sampling before and after each major unit operation. In addition to monitoring more traditional parameters of treatment effectiveness, such as total carbon and phenol removal, acute toxicity and mutagenicity studies were done on these samples, both before and after fractionation. The major mutagenic activity of these wastes was in the basic and neutral fractions. Toxicity of untreated wastes was primarily due to organics, but toxicity after removal of the organics was also significant. Significant reduction in mutagenicity during primary processing steps was accompanied by high concentrations of known mutagens in the sludges produced during these steps, thus indicating that future research focusing on these sludges is desirable.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
5210067
Report Number(s):
CONF-800599-1
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 35. annual Purdue industrial waste conference, West Lafayette, IN, USA, 13 May 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL GASIFICATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; WASTE WATER; MUTAGEN SCREENING; AMMONIA; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CARBON; CARBONIZATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; HYDROGENATION; MUTAGENESIS; OZONE; PHENOL; SLUDGES; TOXICITY; WASTE PROCESSING; AROMATICS; CHALCOGENIDES; DECOMPOSITION; ELEMENTS; GASIFICATION; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; LIQUID WASTES; MANAGEMENT; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHENOLS; PROCESSING; SCREENING; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; WATER; 560302* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Microorganisms- (-1987); 010404 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Gasification; 016000 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Health & Safety

Citation Formats

Brand, J. I., Klein, J. A., Parkhurst, B. R., and Rao, T. K.. Mutagenicity and toxicity of treated aqueous effluents from coal conversion processes. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Brand, J. I., Klein, J. A., Parkhurst, B. R., & Rao, T. K.. Mutagenicity and toxicity of treated aqueous effluents from coal conversion processes. United States.
Brand, J. I., Klein, J. A., Parkhurst, B. R., and Rao, T. K.. 1980. "Mutagenicity and toxicity of treated aqueous effluents from coal conversion processes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5210067.
@article{osti_5210067,
title = {Mutagenicity and toxicity of treated aqueous effluents from coal conversion processes},
author = {Brand, J. I. and Klein, J. A. and Parkhurst, B. R. and Rao, T. K.},
abstractNote = {Coal gasification and hydrocarbonization wastewaters were treated in a series of bench-scale unit operations representative of a conceptual treatment process. Ammonia stripping, biological oxidation, ozonation and carbon adsorption were performed with sampling before and after each major unit operation. In addition to monitoring more traditional parameters of treatment effectiveness, such as total carbon and phenol removal, acute toxicity and mutagenicity studies were done on these samples, both before and after fractionation. The major mutagenic activity of these wastes was in the basic and neutral fractions. Toxicity of untreated wastes was primarily due to organics, but toxicity after removal of the organics was also significant. Significant reduction in mutagenicity during primary processing steps was accompanied by high concentrations of known mutagens in the sludges produced during these steps, thus indicating that future research focusing on these sludges is desirable.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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