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Title: Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters

Abstract

The effects of training and competition on iron status and body composition of ice skaters were evaluated pre-season (PS), during competitive season (CS), and out of season (OS). Eighteen females, aged 14 to 16, with mean heights and weights of 158.2 +/- 4.1cm, and 50.9 +/- 5.2 kg, respectively, participated. During each season, fasted, cenous blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Mg), serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and serum ferritin (F). Percent body fat was estimated from skinfolds (SF) and from underwater weighting (UW). Mean percent PS body fat was 20% by both UW and SF. UW values did not change significantly with seasons. In contrast, percent SF body fat were significantly higher OS than PS and CS. Heights and weights did not differ significantly during the year. Mean Hcts were normal throughout the seasons, however mean Hbs were significantly lower during CS than OS (14.5 vs. 15.5gm/dl, respectively). Mean F did not vary significantly PS and OS. Mean SI and TIBC were in normal ranges although OS means were significantly higher than PS and CS. The results indicate that the iron status of the ice skaters in the study varied with the training seasons andmore » was lower during CS.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston
OSTI Identifier:
5206968
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5206968
Report Number(s):
CONF-8604222-
Journal ID: CODEN: FEPRA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:3; Conference: 70. annual meeting of the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, MO, USA, 13 Apr 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; IRON; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; BLOOD; FAT CELLS; FEMALES; HEMOGLOBIN; MAN; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; ELEMENTS; GLOBIN; HETEROCYCLIC ACIDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; METALS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PIGMENTS; PORPHYRINS; PRIMATES; PROTEINS; SOMATIC CELLS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VARIATIONS; VERTEBRATES 550500* -- Metabolism

Citation Formats

Ziegler, P.J., Caldwell, M.J., Gerber, L.E., and Rand, A.G. Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Ziegler, P.J., Caldwell, M.J., Gerber, L.E., & Rand, A.G. Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters. United States.
Ziegler, P.J., Caldwell, M.J., Gerber, L.E., and Rand, A.G. Sat . "Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5206968,
title = {Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters},
author = {Ziegler, P.J. and Caldwell, M.J. and Gerber, L.E. and Rand, A.G.},
abstractNote = {The effects of training and competition on iron status and body composition of ice skaters were evaluated pre-season (PS), during competitive season (CS), and out of season (OS). Eighteen females, aged 14 to 16, with mean heights and weights of 158.2 +/- 4.1cm, and 50.9 +/- 5.2 kg, respectively, participated. During each season, fasted, cenous blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Mg), serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and serum ferritin (F). Percent body fat was estimated from skinfolds (SF) and from underwater weighting (UW). Mean percent PS body fat was 20% by both UW and SF. UW values did not change significantly with seasons. In contrast, percent SF body fat were significantly higher OS than PS and CS. Heights and weights did not differ significantly during the year. Mean Hcts were normal throughout the seasons, however mean Hbs were significantly lower during CS than OS (14.5 vs. 15.5gm/dl, respectively). Mean F did not vary significantly PS and OS. Mean SI and TIBC were in normal ranges although OS means were significantly higher than PS and CS. The results indicate that the iron status of the ice skaters in the study varied with the training seasons and was lower during CS.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

Conference:
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