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Title: Fusion heating technology

Abstract

John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
TRW, INC., Redondo Beach, California 90278
OSTI Identifier:
5201556
Report Number(s):
CONF-820217-
Journal ID: CODEN: ENTED; TRN: 84-006388
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Technol. (Wash., D.C.); (United States); Journal Volume: 9; Conference: 9. energy technology conference, Washington, DC, USA, 16 Feb 1982
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ECR HEATING; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ICR HEATING; LOWER HYBRID HEATING; BEAM CURRENTS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; HEAT LOSSES; NEUTRAL BEAM SOURCES; PLASMA CONFINEMENT; PLASMA DENSITY; RADIATION HEATING; THERMONUCLEAR DEVICES; CONFINEMENT; CURRENTS; ENERGY LOSSES; HEATING; HIGH-FREQUENCY HEATING; LOSSES; PLASMA HEATING; RADIATIONS; 700205* - Fusion Power Plant Technology- Fuel, Heating, & Injection Systems

Citation Formats

Cole, A.J. Fusion heating technology. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Cole, A.J. Fusion heating technology. United States.
Cole, A.J. 1982. "Fusion heating technology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5201556,
title = {Fusion heating technology},
author = {Cole, A.J.},
abstractNote = {John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.},
doi = {},
journal = {Energy Technol. (Wash., D.C.); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month = 6
}

Conference:
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