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Title: Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides

Abstract

Pharmacological vasodilatation with either dipyridamole or adenosine is a safe and accurate alternative to exercise testing to diagnose coronary artery disease with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The technique also provides important prognostic information with regard to future cardiac events in patients undergoing diagnostic testing, in those evaluated preoperatively, and in those with recent myocardial infarctions. Multigated equilibrium and first-pass radionuclide ventriculography also are well suited to evaluate the effects of interventional procedures. Success has been achieved using this methodology in a variety of interventions including conventional exercise testing, pharmacological stress testing, atrial pacing, assessment of myocardial viability with nitroglycerin, mental stress testing, and ambulatory monitoring of left ventricular ejection fraction. 67 references.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5190169
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Seminars in Nuclear Medicine; (United States); Journal Volume: 21:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; DIAGNOSIS; HEART; IMAGE PROCESSING; ADENOSINE; ELECTROCARDIOGRAMS; EXERCISE; PATIENTS; THALLIUM 201; VASODILATORS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DIAGRAMS; DISEASES; DRUGS; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; HEAVY NUCLEI; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; NUCLEI; NUCLEOSIDES; NUCLEOTIDES; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PROCESSING; RADIOISOTOPES; RIBOSIDES; SECONDS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; THALLIUM ISOTOPES; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

DePuey, E.G., and Rozanski, A. Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(05)80047-9.
DePuey, E.G., & Rozanski, A. Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides. United States. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(05)80047-9.
DePuey, E.G., and Rozanski, A. 1991. "Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides". United States. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(05)80047-9.
@article{osti_5190169,
title = {Pharmacological and other nonexercise alternatives to exercise testing to evaluate myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function with radionuclides},
author = {DePuey, E.G. and Rozanski, A.},
abstractNote = {Pharmacological vasodilatation with either dipyridamole or adenosine is a safe and accurate alternative to exercise testing to diagnose coronary artery disease with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The technique also provides important prognostic information with regard to future cardiac events in patients undergoing diagnostic testing, in those evaluated preoperatively, and in those with recent myocardial infarctions. Multigated equilibrium and first-pass radionuclide ventriculography also are well suited to evaluate the effects of interventional procedures. Success has been achieved using this methodology in a variety of interventions including conventional exercise testing, pharmacological stress testing, atrial pacing, assessment of myocardial viability with nitroglycerin, mental stress testing, and ambulatory monitoring of left ventricular ejection fraction. 67 references.},
doi = {10.1016/S0001-2998(05)80047-9},
journal = {Seminars in Nuclear Medicine; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 21:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 4
}
  • The effects of exercise training on exercise myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function in the first 6 months after clinically uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were assessed in 53 consecutive men aged 55 +/- 9 years. Symptom-limited treadmill exercise with thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and symptom-limited upright bicycle ergometry with equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography were performed 3, 11 and 26 weeks after AMI by 23 men randomized to training and 30 randomized to no training. Peak cycle capacity increased in both groups between 3 and 26 weeks (p less than 0.01), but reached higher levels in trained than inmore » untrained patients (803 +/- 149 vs 648 +/- 182 kg-m/min, p less than 0.01). Reversible thallium perfusion defects were significantly more frequent at 3 than at 26 weeks: 59% and 36% of patients, respectively (p less than 0.05), without significant inter-group differences. Values of LV ejection fraction at rest, submaximal and peak exercise did not change significantly in either group. The increase in functional capacity, i.e., peak treadmill or bicycle workload, that occurred 3 to 26 weeks after infarction was significantly correlated with the increase in peak exercise heart rate (p less than 0.001), but not with changes in myocardial perfusion or LV function determined by radionuclide techniques. Changes in myocardial perfusion or LV function do not appear to account for the improvement in peak functional capacity that occurs within the first 6 months after clinically uncomplicated AMI.« less
  • Seven men ranging in age from 35 to 63 years with a chest pain syndrome and cineangiographically documented systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery underwent thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and gated cardiac blood pool imaging. Grade II (50 to 75 percent) systolic coronary arterial constriction was present in three patients and grade III constriction (greater than 75 percent) in four. Three of the four patients with grade III constriction had an exercise-induced perfusion abnormality in the thallium-201 scintigram and impaired left ventricular ejection fraction response during exercise. (In two patients the left ventricular ejection fraction did not changemore » and in one patient it decreased.) Each of the three patients with grade II constriction had normal thallium-201 perfusion and a normal increase in ejection fraction during exercise. These data provide evidence of abnormal myocardial perfusion and impaired left ventricular function during exercise in patients with high grade systolic coronary arterial narrowing.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and implications of false-negative exercise electrocardiographic results among 216 consecutive patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (50 percent diameter narrowing or greater of one or more vessels). Exercise electrocardiography gave negative (false-negative) results in 23 patients and positive (true-positive) results in 102 patients, and were nondiagnostic in the rest. Exercise thallium-201 imaging was performed in 88 patients. The extent of coronary artery disease was quantitated by a scoring system that takes into consideration the degree and site of narrowing in the major vessels and their branches. The exercise heartmore » rate was higher in patients with false-negative than in patients with true-positive exercise electrocardiographic results (161 +/- 18 versus 133 +/- 24 beats per minute, mean +/- SD; p less than 0.0001). Q-wave infarction was present in two patients (9 percent) with false-negative and 20 patients (20 percent) with true-positive exercise electrocardiographic results (p . NS); left ventricular asynergy at rest was observed in 13 patients (57 percent) with false-negative and in 74 patients (74 percent) with true-positive results (p . NS). Patients with false-negative results had less extensive coronary disease than did patients with true-positive results (score 5.8 +/- 3.6 versus 9.2 +/- 5.0; p . 0.0025). Angina during exercise was less frequent in patients with false-negative results (p less than 0.01). Abnormal exercise thallium-201 images were seen in 15 of 20 patients (75 percent) with false-negative results and in 56 of 68 patients (82 percent) with true-positive results (p . NS).« less
  • Thallium-201 redistribution pattern after exercise was related to rest and exercise left ventricular regional and global function, measured by radionuclide ventriculography, in 61 patients, 50 with coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixteen patients had exclusively transient thallium defects, suggesting ischemia: in this group, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 65% at rest, falling to 58% during exercise (p less than 0.01). Eight patients had exclusively persistent thallium defects, suggesting scar: LVEF was unchanged during exercise, 58% to 59%. LVEF increased during exercise in the 17 patients without exercise thallium defects, seven with CAD: 66% to 73% (p less than 0.05).more » Individual LV wall segments which exhibited transient or persistent thallium defects contracted abnormally both at rest and during exercise; (2) both transient and persistent thallium defects can be associated with resting dyssynergy; and (3) in some CAD patients, apparent hypoperfusion does not necessarily predict left ventricular dysfunction during exercise.« less
  • Many patients with coronary artery disease treated by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) have a history of previous myocardial injury resulting in a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). The effects of successful PTCA on myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function in these patients were compared to treatment in patients with normal left ventricular EF. There were 21 patients with a normal EF (mean EF 59 +/- 2%) (Group I) and 15 patients with reduced EF (mean EF 43 +/- 1%) (Group II). Before PTCA a similar degree of reversible myocardial ischemia was present on thallium scintigraphy. At peak exercisemore » left ventricular EF in the Group I patients decreased by 4 +/- 1% compared to 8 +/- 1% in Group II. At one month following successful PTCA there was resolution of reversible myocardial ischemia in both groups. No changes in EF at rest were observed. At the same level of exercise as before PTCA the mean EF was 5 +/- 1% higher than the pretreatment value in Group I and 10 +/- 1% higher in Group II. Thus in this study reversible myocardial ischemia was associated with severe compromise in the left ventricular response to exercise which was substantially improved by PTCA.« less