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Title: Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish

Abstract

Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) was dissolved in dietary fat and fed in a single dose to killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Fluorescence microscopic examinations of small intestinal content and frozen sections of whole small intestine revealed that during fat digestion BP was codispersed in liquid crystalline product phases produced during lipolysis and then coabsorbed with dietary lipid followed by its reappearance in intracellular fat droplets. During the time that the absorbed fat remained in the enterocytes, BP fluorescence was initially concentrated in the intracellular fat droplets and then spread throughout the cytosol of the enterocytes. Tissue analyses showed that BP was rapidly metabolized in the intestine and transported to the gallbladder. These studies show that separation of a dissolved hydrophobic carcinogen from dietary fat occurs primarily after the fat has been digested, dispersed, absorbed, and reassembled in the enterocyte. The inability of the enterocyte to discriminate between dietary fat and dissolved carcinogenic compounds may be a partial explanation of the observed link between high fat diets and the incidence of some cancers. In vertebrates, the intestine and not the liver, appears to be the major site of metabolism of dietary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Georgia, Athens
OSTI Identifier:
5175839
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5175839
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. Lipid Res.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BENZOPYRENE; INTESTINAL ABSORPTION; METABOLISM; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; BIOLOGICAL MODELS; DIET; FISHES; FLUORESCENCE; LIPIDS; SMALL INTESTINE; ABSORPTION; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; AROMATICS; BODY; CONDENSED AROMATICS; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; HYDROCARBONS; INTESTINES; KINETICS; LUMINESCENCE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; REACTION KINETICS; UPTAKE; VERTEBRATES 560305* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Vertebrates-- (-1987); 550500 -- Metabolism

Citation Formats

Vetter, R.D., Carey, M.C., and Patton, J.S. Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Vetter, R.D., Carey, M.C., & Patton, J.S. Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish. United States.
Vetter, R.D., Carey, M.C., and Patton, J.S. Mon . "Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish". United States.
@article{osti_5175839,
title = {Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish},
author = {Vetter, R.D. and Carey, M.C. and Patton, J.S.},
abstractNote = {Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) was dissolved in dietary fat and fed in a single dose to killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Fluorescence microscopic examinations of small intestinal content and frozen sections of whole small intestine revealed that during fat digestion BP was codispersed in liquid crystalline product phases produced during lipolysis and then coabsorbed with dietary lipid followed by its reappearance in intracellular fat droplets. During the time that the absorbed fat remained in the enterocytes, BP fluorescence was initially concentrated in the intracellular fat droplets and then spread throughout the cytosol of the enterocytes. Tissue analyses showed that BP was rapidly metabolized in the intestine and transported to the gallbladder. These studies show that separation of a dissolved hydrophobic carcinogen from dietary fat occurs primarily after the fat has been digested, dispersed, absorbed, and reassembled in the enterocyte. The inability of the enterocyte to discriminate between dietary fat and dissolved carcinogenic compounds may be a partial explanation of the observed link between high fat diets and the incidence of some cancers. In vertebrates, the intestine and not the liver, appears to be the major site of metabolism of dietary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Lipid Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {1985},
month = {4}
}