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Title: Initiation of a coronal transient

Abstract

This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the topmore » of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research
OSTI Identifier:
5169936
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophys. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 254:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; SOLAR CORONA; STAR MODELS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PLASMA; SOLAR PROMINENCES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SOLAR ACTIVITY; 640104* - Astrophysics & Cosmology- Solar Phenomena

Citation Formats

Low, B.C., Munro, R.H., and Fisher, R.R. Initiation of a coronal transient. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.1086/159737.
Low, B.C., Munro, R.H., & Fisher, R.R. Initiation of a coronal transient. United States. doi:10.1086/159737.
Low, B.C., Munro, R.H., and Fisher, R.R. Mon . "Initiation of a coronal transient". United States. doi:10.1086/159737.
@article{osti_5169936,
title = {Initiation of a coronal transient},
author = {Low, B.C. and Munro, R.H. and Fisher, R.R.},
abstractNote = {This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.},
doi = {10.1086/159737},
journal = {Astrophys. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 254:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}
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