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Title: Seismic images of modern convergent margin tectonic structure

Abstract

An atlas of 14 seismic sections shows major tectonic features across various convergent margins. All sections are at the same scale and have been processed to a research level. Such processing produces clear images of sediment accretion from below. Most margins show sediment subduction. The results of tectonic erosion are seen in midslope areas as buttresses against which the accretion complex is stacked. The images of structures indicating tectonic erosion are about as common as the images of structure indicating accretion.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA
OSTI Identifier:
5163920
Report Number(s):
CONF-8608105-
Journal ID: CODEN: AAPGB
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol., Bull.; (United States); Journal Volume: 70:7; Conference: 4. circum-Pacific energy and mineral resource conference, Singapore, China, 17 Aug 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; CONTINENTAL MARGIN; SEISMIC SURVEYS; TECTONICS; SEDIMENTARY BASINS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; SURVEYS 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Von Huene, R., and Miller, J. Seismic images of modern convergent margin tectonic structure. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Von Huene, R., & Miller, J. Seismic images of modern convergent margin tectonic structure. United States.
Von Huene, R., and Miller, J. 1986. "Seismic images of modern convergent margin tectonic structure". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5163920,
title = {Seismic images of modern convergent margin tectonic structure},
author = {Von Huene, R. and Miller, J.},
abstractNote = {An atlas of 14 seismic sections shows major tectonic features across various convergent margins. All sections are at the same scale and have been processed to a research level. Such processing produces clear images of sediment accretion from below. Most margins show sediment subduction. The results of tectonic erosion are seen in midslope areas as buttresses against which the accretion complex is stacked. The images of structures indicating tectonic erosion are about as common as the images of structure indicating accretion.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol., Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 70:7,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • Mesozoic rocks of the Baja California peninsula form one of the most extensive, best exposed, oldest (160 m.y.), and least-tectonized and metamorphosed convergent margin basin complexes in the world. Much of the fill of these basins consist of coarse-grained volcaniclastic and epiclastic sequences that directly reflect the tectonic evolution of the region. The early history of the convergent margin was dominated by sedimentation in small, steep-sided basins within oceanic island arc systems. The Triassic and Jurassic convergent margin basins probably represent proto-Pacific terranes that traveled from another area. These terranes were assembled by the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, andmore » underlie the forearc region of a medial Cretaceous oceanic island arc system. Tbis system fringed the Mesoamerican continental margin and underwent regional-scale extension during subduction of old, dense lithosphere. The latest phases of sedimentation in the convergent margin occurred in broad, relatively stable forearc basins of a mature continental arc, during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene. Nonetheless, intrabasinal faults provided some controls on depositional systems and bathymetry. The authors speculate that these faults formed in response to oblique convergence which ultimately resulted in 10-19{degree} northward displacement of Baja California relative to the North American craton, from the latitude of Central America to northern Mexico. The fill of oceanic island arc basins in Baja California is dominated by coarse-grained marine wedges including (1) arc apron deposits, consisting of pyroclastic and/or volcanic epiclastic debris deposited in intra-arc or back-arc basins, and (2) slope apron deposits, consisting of epiclastic debris shed from local fault scarps and more distally derived arc volcaniclastics, deposited in forearc basins.« less
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  • The Atlantic continental margin developed across the boundary between continental and oceanic crust as rifting and then sea-floor spreading broke apart and separated the North American and African plates, forming the Atlantic Ocean Basin. Continental rifting began in Late Triassic with reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults as normal faults and with extension across a broad zone of subparallel rift basins. Extension became localized in Early to Middle Jurassic along the zone that now underlies the large marginal basins, and other rift zones, such as the Newark, Hartford, and Fundy basins, were abandoned. Rifting and crustal stretching between the two continentsmore » gave way to sea-floor spreading Middle Jurassic and the formation of oceanic crust. This tectonic evolution resulted in formation of distinctive structural features. The marginal basins are underlain by a thinner crust and contain a variety of fault-controlled structures, including half-grabens, seaward- and landward-tilted blocks, faults that die out within the crust, and faults that penetrate the entire crust. This variable structure probably resulted from the late Triassic-Early Jurassic pattern of normal, listric, and antithetic faults that evolved from the Paleozoic thrust fault geometry. The boundary between marginal basins and oceanic crust is marked approximately by the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA). A major basement fault is located in the Baltimore Canyon trough at the landward edge of the ECMA and a zone of seaward dipping reflectors is found just seaward of the ECMA off Georges Bank. The fracture zone pattern in Mesozoic oceanic crust can be traced landward to the ECMA.« less
  • Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.
  • Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.