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Title: Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields

Abstract

Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field,more » although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5163831
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Prog. Clin. Biol. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 257
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BEHAVIOR; REVIEWS; DOCUMENT TYPES 560400* -- Other Environmental Pollutant Effects

Citation Formats

Lovely, R.H. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Lovely, R.H. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields. United States.
Lovely, R.H. 1988. "Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5163831,
title = {Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields},
author = {Lovely, R.H.},
abstractNote = {Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field, although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {Prog. Clin. Biol. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 257,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}
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