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Title: Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion

Abstract

The relationships among changes in plasma nicotine, ACTH, and cortisol secretion after smoking were investigated. Ten male subjects smoked cigarettes containing 2.87 mg nicotine and 0.48 mg nicotine. No rises in cortisol or ACTH were detected after smoking 0.48 mg nicotine cigarettes. Cortisol rises were significant in 11 of 15 instances after smoking 2.87 mg nicotine cigarattes, but ACTH rose significantly in only 5 of the 11 instances where cortisol increased. Each ACTH rise occurred in a subject who reported nausea and was observed to be pale, sweaty, and tachycardic. Peak plasma nicotine concentrations were not significantly different in sessions when cortisol rose with or without ACTH increases, but cortisol increases were significantly greater in nauseated than in non-nauseated smokers. This data suggest that smoking-induced nausea stimulates cortisol release by stimulating ACTH secretion and that cortisol secretion in non-nauseated smokers may occur through a non-ACTH mechanism.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington
OSTI Identifier:
5125668
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Life Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 34:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ACTH; BIOCHEMISTRY; HYDROCORTISONE; TOBACCO SMOKES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BLOOD PLASMA; MAN; NAUSEA; NICOTINE; ADRENAL HORMONES; AEROSOLS; ALKALOIDS; AMINES; ANIMALS; AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS; AZINES; AZOLES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BODY FLUIDS; CHEMISTRY; COLLOIDS; CORTICOSTEROIDS; DISPERSIONS; DRUGS; GLUCOCORTICOIDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; HORMONES; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; KETONES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PARASYMPATHOLYTICS; PARASYMPATHOMIMETICS; PEPTIDE HORMONES; PITUITARY HORMONES; PREGNANES; PRIMATES; PYRIDINES; PYRROLES; PYRROLIDINES; RESIDUES; SMOKES; SOLS; STEROID HORMONES; STEROIDS; SYMPTOMS; VERTEBRATES; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Seyler, L.E. Jr., Fertig, J., Pomerleau, O., Hunt, D., and Parker, K. Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(84)90330-8.
Seyler, L.E. Jr., Fertig, J., Pomerleau, O., Hunt, D., & Parker, K. Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion. United States. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(84)90330-8.
Seyler, L.E. Jr., Fertig, J., Pomerleau, O., Hunt, D., and Parker, K. 1984. "Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion". United States. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(84)90330-8.
@article{osti_5125668,
title = {Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion},
author = {Seyler, L.E. Jr. and Fertig, J. and Pomerleau, O. and Hunt, D. and Parker, K.},
abstractNote = {The relationships among changes in plasma nicotine, ACTH, and cortisol secretion after smoking were investigated. Ten male subjects smoked cigarettes containing 2.87 mg nicotine and 0.48 mg nicotine. No rises in cortisol or ACTH were detected after smoking 0.48 mg nicotine cigarettes. Cortisol rises were significant in 11 of 15 instances after smoking 2.87 mg nicotine cigarattes, but ACTH rose significantly in only 5 of the 11 instances where cortisol increased. Each ACTH rise occurred in a subject who reported nausea and was observed to be pale, sweaty, and tachycardic. Peak plasma nicotine concentrations were not significantly different in sessions when cortisol rose with or without ACTH increases, but cortisol increases were significantly greater in nauseated than in non-nauseated smokers. This data suggest that smoking-induced nausea stimulates cortisol release by stimulating ACTH secretion and that cortisol secretion in non-nauseated smokers may occur through a non-ACTH mechanism.},
doi = {10.1016/0024-3205(84)90330-8},
journal = {Life Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 34:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 1
}
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