skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Soviet satellite communications science and technology

Abstract

This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary butmore » not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5123315
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5123315; Legacy ID: TI92001874
Report Number(s):
FASAC-TAR-92001874
ON: TI92001874
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMMUNICATIONS; SATELLITES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS; ANTENNAS; DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS; DIGITAL SYSTEMS; LAUNCHING; POWER GENERATION; SIGNALS; USSR; ASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; EUROPE 420200* -- Engineering-- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques; 990300 -- Information Handling

Citation Formats

Birch, J.N., Campanella, S.J., Gordon, G.D., McElroy, D.R., Pritchard, W.L., and Stamminger, R. Soviet satellite communications science and technology. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2172/5123315.
Birch, J.N., Campanella, S.J., Gordon, G.D., McElroy, D.R., Pritchard, W.L., & Stamminger, R. Soviet satellite communications science and technology. United States. doi:10.2172/5123315.
Birch, J.N., Campanella, S.J., Gordon, G.D., McElroy, D.R., Pritchard, W.L., and Stamminger, R. Thu . "Soviet satellite communications science and technology". United States. doi:10.2172/5123315. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5123315.
@article{osti_5123315,
title = {Soviet satellite communications science and technology},
author = {Birch, J.N. and Campanella, S.J. and Gordon, G.D. and McElroy, D.R. and Pritchard, W.L. and Stamminger, R.},
abstractNote = {This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary but not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.},
doi = {10.2172/5123315},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991},
month = {Thu Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: