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Title: Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Aberdeen Pesticide/Fairway Six, Inc. (First Remedial Action), June 1989

Abstract

The Aberdeen Pesticide Dumps/Fairway Six site is a former disposal area in Moore County, North Carolina, approximately 1.6 miles west-northwest of Aberdeen. In August 1984, the State was alerted that pesticides had been disposed of at and around the site for a number of years. A State inspection revealed that soil and debris were contaminated with pesticides. In June 1985, EPA initiated an emergency response action to excavate and remove onsite contaminated surface soil and two buried trenches. The soil and debris were disposed of offsite. The predominant contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are chlorinated organo-pesticides. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavating and homogenizing stockpiled pesticide-contaminated wastes; treating homogenized wastes in an onsite, mobile thermal treatment facility and reinjecting process waste water or scrubber blowdown into the thermal treatment facility.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Emergency and Remedial Response
OSTI Identifier:
5123267
Report Number(s):
PB-90-122672/XAB; EPA/ROD/R--04-89/047
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; PESTICIDES; LAND POLLUTION; REMEDIAL ACTION; WASTE DISPOSAL; SUPERFUND; GROUND WATER; MONITORING; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SOILS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; LAWS; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION LAWS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WATER 320305* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Industrial Waste Management; 540220 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Not Available. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Aberdeen Pesticide/Fairway Six, Inc. (First Remedial Action), June 1989. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Not Available. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Aberdeen Pesticide/Fairway Six, Inc. (First Remedial Action), June 1989. United States.
Not Available. 1989. "Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Aberdeen Pesticide/Fairway Six, Inc. (First Remedial Action), June 1989". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5123267,
title = {Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Aberdeen Pesticide/Fairway Six, Inc. (First Remedial Action), June 1989},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Aberdeen Pesticide Dumps/Fairway Six site is a former disposal area in Moore County, North Carolina, approximately 1.6 miles west-northwest of Aberdeen. In August 1984, the State was alerted that pesticides had been disposed of at and around the site for a number of years. A State inspection revealed that soil and debris were contaminated with pesticides. In June 1985, EPA initiated an emergency response action to excavate and remove onsite contaminated surface soil and two buried trenches. The soil and debris were disposed of offsite. The predominant contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are chlorinated organo-pesticides. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavating and homogenizing stockpiled pesticide-contaminated wastes; treating homogenized wastes in an onsite, mobile thermal treatment facility and reinjecting process waste water or scrubber blowdown into the thermal treatment facility.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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  • The Aberdeen Pesticide Dumps site consists of a plant area and four disposal areas in Aberdeen, Moore County, North Carolina. The five areas are Farm Chemicals, Twin Sites, Fairway Six, McIver Dump, and Route 211. Ground water is the main source of drinking water for local residents. After investigations by EPA's Emergency Response Section in 1985 and 1986, several removal actions were conducted, including removing surface contaminants, drums, and soil in several areas. The ROD concurrently addresses surface and subsurface soil contamination. The amended remedial action for this site includes conducting a treatability study using thermal desorption; excavating and treatingmore » a total of 123,933 cubic yards of soil from all five areas including previously excavated soil from the Fairway Six and McIver Dump areas using an onsite thermal desorption process that includes an activated carbon adsorption to treat off-gases, followed by offsite incineration of residual organics.« less
  • The Bally Ground Water site is a municipal water supply well field in the Borough of Bally in Berks County, near the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Since the 1930s degreasing solvents containing methylene chloride, TCA, methanol, toluene, and TCE have been used in manufacturing at the plant. One of the plant's facilities includes a drum storage area which contains empty drums, waste oil, and spent degreasers. A 1982 State water-quality check identified the plant as a source of VOC contamination in Bally's municipal wells. Results of additional ground-water contamination studies indicated that 19 of 35 wells sampled contained detectable levels ofmore » VOCs. Currently, a plume of VOC-contaminated ground water extends from the plant to the east and northeast. The selected remedial action for this site includes abandoning appropriate wells in the attainment area; pumping and treatment of ground water from Municipal Well No. 3 by air stripping with either vapor-phase carbon, regenerable vapor phase carbon, or vapor-phase catalytic oxidation, followed by discharging treated water to an adjacent stream or into the municipal potable water system.« less
  • The 0.75-acre Wedzeb Enterprises site is located in Lebanon, Indiana. Originally, two warehouses, one of which was used as a storage facility for electrical capacitors and transformers containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were located on site. In May 1981 the warehouse used for storage was completely destroyed by fire. Contaminants may have been washed into the sewer lines during the fire, providing a source of long-term contaminant release to the Lebanon publicly-owned treatment works (POTW). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the sewer sediment are PCBs. The selected remedial action for the site includes cleaning the sewer lines with hydraulic jetsmore » and vacuum pumping to remove contaminants, followed by filtering the resulting water and sediment to remove PCB-contaminated sediment, and discharging the water to the POTW; offsite incineration and disposal of the estimated 2 drums of sediment and 20 drums of remedial-investigation-generated waste if PCB levels are 50 mg/kg or greater, or offsite disposal only if PCB levels are below 50 mg/kg; and a television inspection of the pipeline to ensure structural integrity.« less
  • The MIDCO I site is a four-acre, abandoned industrial-waste recycling, storage, and disposal facility in Gary, Indiana. Twelve drinking-water wells have been identified within approximately one mile of the site. The Calumet Aquifer, one of the two major aquifers underlying the site and providing water to these wells, is highly susceptible to contamination from surface sources. Within a three-year period, the site owners accepted and stockpiled approximately 6,000-7,000 55-gallon drums containing bulk liquid waste, and 4 bulk tanks, each 4,000-10,000 gallons. In June 1981 severe flooding caused water in the area to drain west into a neighboring city; contact withmore » the flood water reportedly resulted in skin burns. In 1982 extensive surface wastes, an underground tank, and the top one foot of contaminated soil were removed. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and TCE; other organics including PCBs, phenols, and PAHs; and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.« less
  • The MIDCO II site is a seven-acre storage and disposal facility in Gary, Indiana. The surrounding area is predominantly used for industrial purposes, and includes 34 other potential hazardous-waste sites. The underlying aquifer is highly susceptible to contamination from surface sources because of the high water table; however, in the vicinity of the site, the aquifer is used primarily for non-drinking-water purposes. The same operator as at another Superfund site, MIDCO I, began waste operations, including drum storage at MIDCO II during the summer of 1976. Following a major fire at the MIDCO I site in January 1977, MIDCO transferredmore » the operations from the MIDCO I site to the MIDCO II site. Operations included temporarily storing bulk liquid and drum wastes; neutralizing acids and caustics; and disposing of wastes by dumping wastes into onsite pits, which allowed wastes to percolate into the ground water. The resulting PCB-contaminated soil pile was removed and disposed of in an offsite hazardous waste landfill in early 1986, and most of the cyanide-contaminated pile was also removed. Removal activities ended in January 1986. The primary contaminants of concern currently affecting the soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, TCE, and xylenes; other organics including PCBs; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.« less