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Title: Transcending Newton's legacy

Abstract

Science was transformed during the twentieth century by three revolutionary developments: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and quantum theory. These developments altered not only scientific practice, but also our ideas about the nature of science and the nature of the world itself. The author discusses these three developments with regard to both their essential differences from classical Newtonian science, and their potential impact upon the human condition.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5120154
Report Number(s):
LBL-24322; CONF-8711189-1; CONF-8711189-
ON: DE88010784
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Newton's legacy: a symposium on the origins and influence of Newtonian science, New Orleans, LA, USA, 12 Nov 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CLASSICAL MECHANICS; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; RELATIVITY THEORY; FIELD THEORIES; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; MECHANICS; 657002* - Theoretical & Mathematical Physics- Classical & Quantum Mechanics; 657003 - Theoretical & Mathematical Physics- Relativity & Gravitation

Citation Formats

Stapp, H.P. Transcending Newton's legacy. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Stapp, H.P. Transcending Newton's legacy. United States.
Stapp, H.P. Sun . "Transcending Newton's legacy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5120154.
@article{osti_5120154,
title = {Transcending Newton's legacy},
author = {Stapp, H.P.},
abstractNote = {Science was transformed during the twentieth century by three revolutionary developments: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and quantum theory. These developments altered not only scientific practice, but also our ideas about the nature of science and the nature of the world itself. The author discusses these three developments with regard to both their essential differences from classical Newtonian science, and their potential impact upon the human condition.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Sun Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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