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Title: Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

Abstract

The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dept. of Microbiology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences (IL)
OSTI Identifier:
5113896
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Mol. Cell. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 8:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CARCINOGENS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; ONCOGENES; GENE AMPLIFICATION; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; PHENOTYPE; TRANSCRIPTION; GENES; 550200* - Biochemistry; 550400 - Genetics

Citation Formats

Kleinberger, T., Flint, Y.B., Blank, M., Etkin, S., and Lavi, S.. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1128/MCB.8.3.1366.
Kleinberger, T., Flint, Y.B., Blank, M., Etkin, S., & Lavi, S.. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression. United States. doi:10.1128/MCB.8.3.1366.
Kleinberger, T., Flint, Y.B., Blank, M., Etkin, S., and Lavi, S.. Tue . "Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression". United States. doi:10.1128/MCB.8.3.1366.
@article{osti_5113896,
title = {Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression},
author = {Kleinberger, T. and Flint, Y.B. and Blank, M. and Etkin, S. and Lavi, S.},
abstractNote = {The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.},
doi = {10.1128/MCB.8.3.1366},
journal = {Mol. Cell. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 8:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}
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