skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP)

Abstract

In areas where there is limited capacity to resist input of acid deposition, acid soils and surface waters have affected natural communities and man's uses of the environment. In response to problems of acid soils, farmers added limestone materials to their soil during Roman times; this method of agricultural management continues today. The addition of limestone (CaCo/sub 3/), called liming, has been used more recently to mitigate acidic conditions in lakes and streams. Liming neutralizes acidity directly, provides buffering as acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) or alkalinity, and increases calcium ion concentration which mitigates toxicity in low ionic strength waters. The Lake Acidification Mitigation Project (LAMP) has the objective of identifying and quantifying environmental impacts of liming, and evaluating the effectiveness of liming and stocking procedures in restoring acid lakes. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of LAMP and to summarize results from the initial phases of the project.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5102933
Report Number(s):
CONF-870695--
Journal ID: ISSN 0193-9688; CODEN: PRAPA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Air Pollution Control Association; (USA); Journal Volume: 1; Conference: 80. annual meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association, New York, NY (USA), 21-26 Jun 1987; Other Information: Technical Paper 87-35.4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CALCIUM CARBONATES; ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY; LAKES; ACIDIFICATION; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; EPRI; FISHERIES; LIMING; MITIGATION; PH VALUE; PHYTOPLANKTON; REMEDIAL ACTION; TOXICITY; WATER CHEMISTRY; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBONATES; CHEMISTRY; CONTROL; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLANKTON; POLLUTION CONTROL; SURFACE WATERS 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 540310 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Porcella, D.P.. The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP). United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Porcella, D.P.. The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP). United States.
Porcella, D.P.. 1987. "The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5102933,
title = {The lake acidification mitigation project (LAMP)},
author = {Porcella, D.P.},
abstractNote = {In areas where there is limited capacity to resist input of acid deposition, acid soils and surface waters have affected natural communities and man's uses of the environment. In response to problems of acid soils, farmers added limestone materials to their soil during Roman times; this method of agricultural management continues today. The addition of limestone (CaCo/sub 3/), called liming, has been used more recently to mitigate acidic conditions in lakes and streams. Liming neutralizes acidity directly, provides buffering as acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) or alkalinity, and increases calcium ion concentration which mitigates toxicity in low ionic strength waters. The Lake Acidification Mitigation Project (LAMP) has the objective of identifying and quantifying environmental impacts of liming, and evaluating the effectiveness of liming and stocking procedures in restoring acid lakes. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of LAMP and to summarize results from the initial phases of the project.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Air Pollution Control Association; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Major results of the Humic Lake Acidification Experiment (HUMEX) are summarized, based on 2 y of pretreatment and 2.5 y of posttreatment data. The major objectives of the HUMEX project are to quantify the role of acid deposition on the properties of humic substances (HS) and the role of humic substances (HS) in the acidification processes that occur in soil and water. The project involves artificial acidification of one half of a divided dystrophic lake and the corresponding catchment. A combination of sulphuric acid and ammonium nitrate has been applied via sprinkler systems, mounted on trees, during precipitation events sincemore » 1990. The treatment has resulted in small changes in water quality, including an increase in SO[sub 4], NO[sub 3], and H[sup +] concentrations in the lake water and in the soil water of some of the upper soil horizons, and small changes in the nature of the HS. The results of biological studies show increased toxicity in fish, increase in the phytoplankton primary production, and disappearance of some of the dominating species of zooplankton. Epiphytic growth increased in the treated basin, whereas a group of macrophytes was reduced. Present knowledge of the relationships between chemical changes and biological response is not sufficient to explain the observed changes in biota. 22 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • This report overviews investigations of the ''Lake Acidification and Fisheries'' (LAF) project into the effects of surface water acidification on brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations. Of the six life stages examined, freshly-fertilized eggs were the most sensitive to reduced pH. In contrast, aluminum was most toxic to fry, juvenile, and adult fish. Increased calcium concentrations reduced the toxic effects of acid/aluminum exposure at all life stages. Little evidence was found to indicate that exposure to acidic waters affects oocyte development or production, suggesting that direct mortality plays a larger role in losses of brook trout populations from acidic waters. Formore » fry and adult fish, the major toxic mechanism of acid/aluminum exposure seems to be disturbance of normal ion regulation at the gill, but aluminum exposure can cause respiratory impairment as well. Using results from LAF toxicity studies and available field data, a modeling framework was developed that predicts the probability of presence or absence of brook trout populations, based ion surface water chemistry. In addition, this framework can be used to evaluate changes in this probability caused by changes in water chemistry (e.g., liming), stocking rates, or fishing pressure. 129 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.« less
  • The Lake Acidification and Fisheries (LAF) project examined effects of acidic water chemistries on four fish species. This report presents an overview of investigations on smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui). Experiments conducted with this species included as many as 84 exposure combinations of acid, aluminum, and low calcium. In egg, fry, and juvenile stages of smallmouth bass, increased acid and aluminum concentrations increased mortality and decreased growth, while increased calcium concentrations often improved survival. Relative to the juvenile life stages of smallmouth bass tested, yolksac and swim-up fry were clearly more sensitive to stressful exposure conditions. While eggs appeared to bemore » the most sensitive life stage, this conclusion was compromised by heavy mortalities of eggs due to fungal infestations during experimental exposures. As found in our earlier studies with brook and rainbow trout, acid-aluminum stressed smallmouth bass exhibited net losses of electrolytes across gills and increased accumulation of aluminum on gill tissues. Overall, our results indicated that smallmouth bass were generally more sensitive to increased exposure concentrations of aluminum than to increased acidities. Compared to toxicology results from earlier LAF project studies, smallmouth bass were more sensitive than brook trout and slightly less sensitive than rainbow trout when exposed to water quality conditions associated with acidification.An example application of the LAF modeling framework shows how different liming scenarios can improve survival probabilities for smallmouth bass in a set of lakes sensitive to acidification.« less
  • The Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) began in 1977 as a program to develop a quantitative relationship between the acidity of depositions and that of surface waters. ILWAS researchers developed a general mechanistic theory of lake-watershed acidification that accounts for the production and consumption of acidity by terrestrial and aquatic watershed processes, as well as atmospheric inputs of acidity. This theory has been incorporated into the development of a mathematical computer model that simulates the biogeochemical processes that occur as precipitation is routed through the lake-watershed ecosystem. The ILWAS model and several of its applications have been well documented elsewhere.more » This study illustrates the versatility and utility of the integrated systems approach of the ILWAS model for exploring the complex phenomenon of acidification and evaluating several possible mitigation strategies.« less
  • The Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) was initiated in 1978, under sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI), to study and detail lake acidification processes for three lake watershed basins in the Adirondack Park region of New York. The three basins (Woods, Sagamore, and Panther) receive similar amounts of acid deposition yet have dissimilar lake water pH values, indicating unequal acid neutralizing capacities among the watersheds. This report contains a compilation of 14 papers presented by the ILWAS investigators at the Annual Review Meeting held at Sagamore Lake Conference Center October 1980. Relevant topics include: study overview; characterizationmore » of wet and dry deposition; evaluation of sampling methods for throughfall under various canopies; watershed soil structure, permeability, mineralogy, and aluminum dynamics; mineralization and decomposition attributed to microbial activity during acidification; lake water chemistry and analyses of processes leading to acidification of lake waters during spring snowmelt; sediment studies including an assessment of historical lake pH as determined by diatom analysis, levels of trace elements and PAHs; and effects of acidification on lead mobility in the sediment.« less