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Title: Deforestation and food/fuel context: historico-political perspectives from Nepal

Abstract

The thesis of this paper is that the primary cause of deforestation in Nepal is the clearing of forests for agriculture and fodder and not the need for fuelwood. To successfully counteract deforestation and the resulting ecological damage, it is necessary to consider the full range of needs for rural people: food, fodder, building materials and fuel. This paper first examines the history of Nepalese government concerns from the 18th century to 1950, a period of subsistence agriculture and disregard for scientific farm and forestry management, then focuses on post 1950 government policies designed to conserve forest resources. It documents the influence of the global energy crisis on proposed solutions to Nepal's deforestation problems, especially in the area of international assistance. The nationalization of the forest in 1957 as a means of reducing deforestation was ineffective as it ignored the customs and needs of the local people. The 1976 Forest Plan recognizes the need for local participation but has yet to be implemented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5099435
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; FORESTS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; NEPAL; DEFORESTATION; AGRICULTURE; ANIMAL FEEDS; BIOMASS PLANTATIONS; BUILDING MATERIALS; ECOLOGY; ENERGY POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FOOD; MANAGEMENT; SOCIAL IMPACT; WOOD FUELS; ASIA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; INDUSTRY; MATERIALS 140504* -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Bajracharya, D. Deforestation and food/fuel context: historico-political perspectives from Nepal. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Bajracharya, D. Deforestation and food/fuel context: historico-political perspectives from Nepal. United States.
Bajracharya, D. 1983. "Deforestation and food/fuel context: historico-political perspectives from Nepal". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5099435,
title = {Deforestation and food/fuel context: historico-political perspectives from Nepal},
author = {Bajracharya, D.},
abstractNote = {The thesis of this paper is that the primary cause of deforestation in Nepal is the clearing of forests for agriculture and fodder and not the need for fuelwood. To successfully counteract deforestation and the resulting ecological damage, it is necessary to consider the full range of needs for rural people: food, fodder, building materials and fuel. This paper first examines the history of Nepalese government concerns from the 18th century to 1950, a period of subsistence agriculture and disregard for scientific farm and forestry management, then focuses on post 1950 government policies designed to conserve forest resources. It documents the influence of the global energy crisis on proposed solutions to Nepal's deforestation problems, especially in the area of international assistance. The nationalization of the forest in 1957 as a means of reducing deforestation was ineffective as it ignored the customs and needs of the local people. The 1976 Forest Plan recognizes the need for local participation but has yet to be implemented.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month = 1
}

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