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Title: Chemisorption-facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion

Abstract

The reduction in ductility and fracture stress of many metals tested in certain liquid metal environments is generally known as liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The evidence for plastic deformation on the fracture surfaces of LME failures has led Lynch to propose that the chemisorption of liquid metal can enhance localized plastic deformation. Up to now, however, direct proof of chemisorption facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to study now chemisorption facilitates dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. An in-situ tensile test in a TEM is the most direct and powerful method for studying the dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. Since there is no way to put the liquid metal into a TEM, a special constant deflection loading device has been designed. Using this device, the effect of chemisorption on dislocation emission and motion can be studied based on the dislocation configuration change ahead of a loaded crack tip after chemisorption of liquid metal atoms but before the propagation of the original crack tip or initiation of a new microcrack.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Materials Physics
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
National Natural Science Foundation of China, Beijing, BJ (China)
OSTI Identifier:
509155
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Scripta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; EMBRITTLEMENT; ALUMINIUM; MONOCRYSTALS; CHEMISORPTION; LIQUID METALS; MERCURY; CRACKS; DISLOCATIONS; SURFACE ENERGY; STRESS INTENSITY FACTORS

Citation Formats

Su, Y J, Wang, Y B, and Chu, W Y. Chemisorption-facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1016/S1359-6462(97)00020-1.
Su, Y J, Wang, Y B, & Chu, W Y. Chemisorption-facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1359-6462(97)00020-1
Su, Y J, Wang, Y B, and Chu, W Y. 1997. "Chemisorption-facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1359-6462(97)00020-1.
@article{osti_509155,
title = {Chemisorption-facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion},
author = {Su, Y J and Wang, Y B and Chu, W Y},
abstractNote = {The reduction in ductility and fracture stress of many metals tested in certain liquid metal environments is generally known as liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The evidence for plastic deformation on the fracture surfaces of LME failures has led Lynch to propose that the chemisorption of liquid metal can enhance localized plastic deformation. Up to now, however, direct proof of chemisorption facilitating dislocation emission, multiplication and motion is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to study now chemisorption facilitates dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. An in-situ tensile test in a TEM is the most direct and powerful method for studying the dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. Since there is no way to put the liquid metal into a TEM, a special constant deflection loading device has been designed. Using this device, the effect of chemisorption on dislocation emission and motion can be studied based on the dislocation configuration change ahead of a loaded crack tip after chemisorption of liquid metal atoms but before the propagation of the original crack tip or initiation of a new microcrack.},
doi = {10.1016/S1359-6462(97)00020-1},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/509155}, journal = {Scripta Materialia},
number = 11,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {6}
}