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Title: Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

Abstract

An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
OSTI Identifier:
5090773
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Surgery; (United States); Journal Volume: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; AFTERLOADING; IRIDIUM 192; IRRADIATION PROCEDURES; LARGE INTESTINE; PROSTHESES; RADIATION DOSES; SURGERY; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; DOSES; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; HEAVY NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; INTESTINES; IRIDIUM ISOTOPES; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; MEDICAL SUPPLIES; MEDICINE; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANS; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIOLOGY; RADIOTHERAPY; THERAPY; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 560161* - Radionuclide Effects, Kinetics, & Toxicology- Man; 550604 - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Edington, H.D., Hancock, S., Coe, F.L., and Sugarbaker, P.H. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Edington, H.D., Hancock, S., Coe, F.L., & Sugarbaker, P.H. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer. United States.
Edington, H.D., Hancock, S., Coe, F.L., and Sugarbaker, P.H. 1986. "Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5090773,
title = {Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer},
author = {Edington, H.D. and Hancock, S. and Coe, F.L. and Sugarbaker, P.H.},
abstractNote = {An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Surgery; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 9
}
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