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Title: Formation of mutagenic activity during surface water preozonization and its removal in drinking water treatment

Abstract

The influence of preozonization, coagulation and double layer filtration on formation and removal of mutagenic activity was studied using XAD-8 extracts collected from neutral and acidic solutions and assaying them in the Salmonella typhimurium microsomal assay. Preozonization of surface water produced direct acting frame shift mutagens which were adsorbed on XAD-8 from neutral solutions. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the ozone dose applied. Coagulation with different chemicals and subsequent direct filtration partially reduced the mutagenic activity.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Study Syndicate for Water, Antwerp, Belgium
OSTI Identifier:
5089753
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemosphere; (United States); Journal Volume: 14:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; SURFACE WATERS; MUTAGEN SCREENING; OZONIZATION; WATER TREATMENT; EVALUATION; FILTRATION; FLOCCULATION; ION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY; RIVERS; SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM; BACTERIA; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; MICROORGANISMS; PRECIPITATION; SALMONELLA; SCREENING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; STREAMS; 560302* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Microorganisms- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Van Hoof, F., Janssens, J.G., and Van Dijck, H. Formation of mutagenic activity during surface water preozonization and its removal in drinking water treatment. United States: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.1016/0045-6535(85)90243-7.
Van Hoof, F., Janssens, J.G., & Van Dijck, H. Formation of mutagenic activity during surface water preozonization and its removal in drinking water treatment. United States. doi:10.1016/0045-6535(85)90243-7.
Van Hoof, F., Janssens, J.G., and Van Dijck, H. 1985. "Formation of mutagenic activity during surface water preozonization and its removal in drinking water treatment". United States. doi:10.1016/0045-6535(85)90243-7.
@article{osti_5089753,
title = {Formation of mutagenic activity during surface water preozonization and its removal in drinking water treatment},
author = {Van Hoof, F. and Janssens, J.G. and Van Dijck, H.},
abstractNote = {The influence of preozonization, coagulation and double layer filtration on formation and removal of mutagenic activity was studied using XAD-8 extracts collected from neutral and acidic solutions and assaying them in the Salmonella typhimurium microsomal assay. Preozonization of surface water produced direct acting frame shift mutagens which were adsorbed on XAD-8 from neutral solutions. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the ozone dose applied. Coagulation with different chemicals and subsequent direct filtration partially reduced the mutagenic activity.},
doi = {10.1016/0045-6535(85)90243-7},
journal = {Chemosphere; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 14:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 1
}
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