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Title: Genetic variation and its maintenance

Abstract

This book contains several papers divided among three sections. The section titles are: Genetic Diversity--Its Dimensions; Genetic Diversity--Its Origin and Maintenance; and Genetic Diversity--Applications and Problems of Complex Characters.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5078313
Report Number(s):
CONF-8504311-
TRN: 88-020199
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Genetic variation and its maintenance: special reference to tropical populations, Frascati, Italy, 1 Apr 1985; Related Information: Society for the Study of Human Biology symposium. Series 27
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DNA; STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS; GENETICS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; HUMAN POPULATIONS; GENETIC MAPPING; GENETIC VARIABILITY; TROPICAL REGIONS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION; GENES; HEMOGLOBIN; HEREDITARY DISEASES; INFORMATION NEEDS; LEADING ABSTRACT; MUTATIONS; PROTEINS; SICKLE CELL ANEMIA; ABSTRACTS; ANEMIAS; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; BIOLOGY; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; DISEASES; DOCUMENT TYPES; GLOBIN; HEMIC DISEASES; HETEROCYCLIC ACIDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; MAPPING; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PIGMENTS; POPULATIONS; PORPHYRINS; SYMPTOMS; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Roberts, D.F., and De Stefano, G.F. Genetic variation and its maintenance. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Roberts, D.F., & De Stefano, G.F. Genetic variation and its maintenance. United States.
Roberts, D.F., and De Stefano, G.F. Wed . "Genetic variation and its maintenance". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5078313,
title = {Genetic variation and its maintenance},
author = {Roberts, D.F. and De Stefano, G.F.},
abstractNote = {This book contains several papers divided among three sections. The section titles are: Genetic Diversity--Its Dimensions; Genetic Diversity--Its Origin and Maintenance; and Genetic Diversity--Applications and Problems of Complex Characters.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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