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Title: Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

Abstract

A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5078180
Report Number(s):
SAND-80-1806
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARAMIDS; TENSILE PROPERTIES; NYLON; PARACHUTES; MATERIALS TESTING; AGING; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLASTICS; POLYAMIDES; POLYMERS; TESTING; 360403* - Materials- Polymers & Plastics- Mechanical Properties- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Botner, W.T. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Botner, W.T. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions. United States.
Botner, W.T. 1980. "Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5078180,
title = {Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions},
author = {Botner, W.T.},
abstractNote = {A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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