skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Volcanic and structural controls of mineralization in the Dos Cabezas Mountains of southeastern Arizona

Abstract

A combination of geophysical, geochemical, and geological features suggests that a central part of the Dos Cabezas Mountains probably has considerable potential for blind deposits, chiefly base metals. The area exposes the root zone of a Paleocene( ) volcanic complex and its underlying granitic stocks, which were emplaced next to a major northwest-trending, much reactivated fault zone. The new data, combined with the knowledge of past mining activity in the area, lead them to propose several exploration targets that may lead to ore bodies in breccia pipes along the base of the volcanic pile and along a possible concealed fault or caldera margin.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5077380
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; ARIZONA; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; EXPLORATION; GRANITES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TERTIARY PERIOD; US DOI; VOLCANIC ROCKS; CENOZOIC ERA; FEDERAL REGION IX; GEOLOGIC AGES; IGNEOUS ROCKS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NORTH AMERICA; PLUTONIC ROCKS; ROCKS; US ORGANIZATIONS; USA; 580000* - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Drewes, H., Klein, D.P., and Birmingham, S.D.. Volcanic and structural controls of mineralization in the Dos Cabezas Mountains of southeastern Arizona. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Drewes, H., Klein, D.P., & Birmingham, S.D.. Volcanic and structural controls of mineralization in the Dos Cabezas Mountains of southeastern Arizona. United States.
Drewes, H., Klein, D.P., and Birmingham, S.D.. 1988. "Volcanic and structural controls of mineralization in the Dos Cabezas Mountains of southeastern Arizona". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5077380,
title = {Volcanic and structural controls of mineralization in the Dos Cabezas Mountains of southeastern Arizona},
author = {Drewes, H. and Klein, D.P. and Birmingham, S.D.},
abstractNote = {A combination of geophysical, geochemical, and geological features suggests that a central part of the Dos Cabezas Mountains probably has considerable potential for blind deposits, chiefly base metals. The area exposes the root zone of a Paleocene( ) volcanic complex and its underlying granitic stocks, which were emplaced next to a major northwest-trending, much reactivated fault zone. The new data, combined with the knowledge of past mining activity in the area, lead them to propose several exploration targets that may lead to ore bodies in breccia pipes along the base of the volcanic pile and along a possible concealed fault or caldera margin.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Parts of two small cauldrons and their eruptive products are described. The eruptive products, which include ash-flow tuffs, lavas, extrusive breccias, and domes, range in composition from rhyolite to dacite. A 5 km{sup 2} area of hydrothermally altered rocks is located on the resurgent dome of one of the cauldrons.
  • The Eagletail Mountains Wilderness Study Area is located in southwestern Arizona. There are no identified resources in this study area. An area near and extending into the northwest corner of this study area has a moderate potential for gold, silver, lead, zinc, and copper; a surrounding area has a low potential for these same commodities. An area northeast of Cemetery Ridge and extending along the southern boundary of this study area has a low potential for gold, silver, lead, zinc, copper, manganese, barium, and molybdenum. Along Cemetery Ridge, which crosses the southern boundary of this study area, is an areamore » with a moderate potential for gold and lead and a low potential for gold, barium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc.« less
  • Geologic mapping and chemical sampling show that the north-central part of this wilderness study area in Southwest Arizona has inferred subeconomic manganese resources and a high potential for undiscovered manganese resources of limited extent. Small amounts of placer gold were found along the north border of this study area, and there is a low resource potential for gold and silver in several areas. The resource potential for natural gas is low along the northwest border.
  • The Rawhide Mountains Wilderness Study Area has identified subeconomic resources of gold, silver, and copper in three areas around old mines. There is no additional potential for gold, silver, and copper (high and moderate), manganese (moderate), uranium, vanadium, geothermal, oil and gas, and sand and gravel (low). Metallic deposits are along high-angle faults cutting mylonitic gneiss and schist that underlies the middle Tertiary Buckskin-Rawhide detachment fault. Syntectonic volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the upper plate of the detachment fault host small mineral occurrences.