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Title: Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming

Abstract

Over 150 million gallons of water a day are brought to the surface in the oil fields of Wyoming. The temperature of this water is nearly always greater than 90/sup 0/F, and ranges as high as 230/sup 0/F. The location, volume, temperature, and present use status of co-produced oil field thermal waters are presented briefly.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wyoming Univ., Laramie (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics
OSTI Identifier:
5068772
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/12026-T3
ON: DE84008953
DOE Contract Number:
FC07-79ID12026
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; OIL FIELDS; BY-PRODUCTS; WYOMING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; THERMAL WATERS; WASTE DISPOSAL; FEDERAL REGION VIII; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MANAGEMENT; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; RESOURCES; USA; WASTE MANAGEMENT; Geothermal Legacy; 150101* - Geothermal Energy- Resources & Availability- USA- (-1989); 020200 - Petroleum- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Hinckley, B.S. Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.2172/5068772.
Hinckley, B.S. Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming. United States. doi:10.2172/5068772.
Hinckley, B.S. Mon . "Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming". United States. doi:10.2172/5068772. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5068772.
@article{osti_5068772,
title = {Oil field geothermal waters of Wyoming},
author = {Hinckley, B.S.},
abstractNote = {Over 150 million gallons of water a day are brought to the surface in the oil fields of Wyoming. The temperature of this water is nearly always greater than 90/sup 0/F, and ranges as high as 230/sup 0/F. The location, volume, temperature, and present use status of co-produced oil field thermal waters are presented briefly.},
doi = {10.2172/5068772},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1983},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1983}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysismore » of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.« less
  • Four seasonal hydrographic surveys were conducted in the vicinity of the Buccaneer Oil Field in an effort to describe the physical environment in and around a producing oil and gas field. The measurements made included currents, wind, waves, total suspended solids, and hydrographic parameters including temperature, salinity, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH and transmissivity. The results of the study indicated that the area can best be described as a mixing zone for coastal and offshore waters.
  • The following conclusions were reached from the analysis of the oil and gas reserves in the Elk Basin Field, Wyoming--Montana. The Elk Basin Field is one of the oldest oil fields in the country and, in terms of the original oil in place, one of the largest. Although the field has been producing since 1915, 99.8% of the cumulative production has been obtained since 1942 due to accelerated drilling activity, discovery of the Tensleep, the Madison, the Big Horn, and the Jefferson reservoirs, field unitization, and initiation of fluid injection projects. If the present production practices are continued in themore » future, the proved remaining reserves are estimated to be approximately 42 million STBO, for an ultimate recovery of forty-one percent of the original oil in place. If the secondary recovery is undertaken in the Frontier and the Jefferson--Big Horn Units, the remaining reserves are estimated to be approximately 51 million barrels, or an ultimate recovery of about forty-two percent of the original oil in place. The combined effects of field unitization and secondary recovery projects have been beneficial for the Elk Basin Field. Without these measures the ultimate recovery would have been less than twenty-five percent of the original oil in place.« less