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Title: Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential

Abstract

A new form of cellulose, which is expanded to a smooth gel when dispersed in polar liquids, is produced by a unique, rapid, physical treatment of wood cellulose pulps. A 2% suspension of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in water has thixotropic viscosity properties and is a stable gel on storage, or when subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. At this concentration, MFC is an excellent suspending medium for other solids and an emulsifying base for organic liquids. In laboratory tests, microfibrillated cellulose has been demonstrated to have wide utility in the preparation of foods such as low-calorie whipped toppings, cake frostings, salad dressings, gravies, and sauces. At 0.3% cellulose concentration in ground meats, MFC helps retain juices during cooking. Tests were also conducted in formulating paints, emulsions, and cosmetics and in the use of MFC as a binder for nonwoven textiles and as a mineral suspending agent. From economic studies, it is estimated that a 2% MFC dispersion can be produced for about 1.5 cents/lb, total cost. 6 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ITT Rayonier Inc., Shelton, WA
OSTI Identifier:
5062478
Report Number(s):
CONF-8205234-Vol.2
Journal ID: CODEN: JPSSD
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
J. Appl. Polym. Sci.: Appl. Polym. Symp.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 37; Conference: 9. cellulose conference, Syracuse, NY, USA, 24 May 1982
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; CELLULOSE; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USES; ADDITIVES; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; COMMERCIALIZATION; DRILLING FLUIDS; ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS; FOOD PROCESSING; GELS; MEDICAL SUPPLIES; PAINTS; PAPER; QUANTITY RATIO; WOOD; CARBOHYDRATES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COATINGS; COLLOIDS; DECOMPOSITION; DISPERSIONS; FLUIDS; HYDROLYSIS; LYSIS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; POLYSACCHARIDES; PROCESSING; SACCHARIDES; SOLVOLYSIS; SYNTHESIS; 140504* - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989); 400301 - Organic Chemistry- Chemical & Physicochemical Properties- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Turbak, A F, Snyder, F W, and Sandberg, K R. Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Turbak, A F, Snyder, F W, & Sandberg, K R. Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential. United States.
Turbak, A F, Snyder, F W, and Sandberg, K R. 1983. "Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential". United States.
@article{osti_5062478,
title = {Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential},
author = {Turbak, A F and Snyder, F W and Sandberg, K R},
abstractNote = {A new form of cellulose, which is expanded to a smooth gel when dispersed in polar liquids, is produced by a unique, rapid, physical treatment of wood cellulose pulps. A 2% suspension of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in water has thixotropic viscosity properties and is a stable gel on storage, or when subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. At this concentration, MFC is an excellent suspending medium for other solids and an emulsifying base for organic liquids. In laboratory tests, microfibrillated cellulose has been demonstrated to have wide utility in the preparation of foods such as low-calorie whipped toppings, cake frostings, salad dressings, gravies, and sauces. At 0.3% cellulose concentration in ground meats, MFC helps retain juices during cooking. Tests were also conducted in formulating paints, emulsions, and cosmetics and in the use of MFC as a binder for nonwoven textiles and as a mineral suspending agent. From economic studies, it is estimated that a 2% MFC dispersion can be produced for about 1.5 cents/lb, total cost. 6 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5062478}, journal = {J. Appl. Polym. Sci.: Appl. Polym. Symp.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {1983},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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