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Title: New York/New Jersey regional seismic network

Abstract

Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (L-DGO) continued operating a 31-station seismic network covering parts of New York and New Jersey. The network is being transformed into sub-networks with stations radio telemetered to smart'' recording stations. The sub-network approach is capable of providing improved data at reduced cost. The major research effort during the period of this report was centered about the Saguenay earthquake sequence in Quebec. L-DGO collaborated with the Canadian Geologic Survey in monitoring aftershocks with temporary local stations. Analysis of data from the 1985 Ardsley earthquake in Westchester county continued with a Green's function deconvolution approach to resolve the dimensions of the rupture of the main shock (Mb=4.0) and of the largest aftershock (Mb=3.0). The results corroborate the 1/2-1 km diameter inferred for the rupture and suggest that the segmentation of the Dobbs Ferry fault and of similar in the Manhattan Prong may be controlling the size of historic earthquakes in the New York City region. Finally, a portable seismograph survey was carried out in Palco, Kansas, which showed clearly that seismicity at Palco was induced. 51 refs,, 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering; Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory
Sponsoring Org.:
NRC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5053226
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-5778-Vol.1
ON: TI92000240
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; EARTHQUAKES; MONITORING; NEW JERSEY; SEISMIC ARRAYS; NEW YORK; AFTERSHOCKS; ATTENUATION; BUDGETS; COMMUNICATIONS; COST; GREEN FUNCTION; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; KANSAS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MODIFICATIONS; PROGRESS REPORT; QUEBEC; SEISMIC DETECTION; SEISMIC EVENTS; SEISMIC SURVEYS; SEISMIC WAVES; SEISMICITY; SEISMOGRAPHS; SIGNALS; STRESSES; CANADA; DETECTION; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DOCUMENT TYPES; FEDERAL REGION II; FEDERAL REGION VII; FUNCTIONS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; NORTH AMERICA; SEISMIC DETECTORS; SURVEYS; USA 580000* -- Geosciences; 440700 -- Geophysical & Meteorological Instrumentation-- (1990-); 990300 -- Information Handling

Citation Formats

Seeber, L., Simpson, D., Johnson, D., and Armbruster, J.. New York/New Jersey regional seismic network. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Seeber, L., Simpson, D., Johnson, D., & Armbruster, J.. New York/New Jersey regional seismic network. United States.
Seeber, L., Simpson, D., Johnson, D., and Armbruster, J.. 1991. "New York/New Jersey regional seismic network". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5053226,
title = {New York/New Jersey regional seismic network},
author = {Seeber, L. and Simpson, D. and Johnson, D. and Armbruster, J.},
abstractNote = {Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (L-DGO) continued operating a 31-station seismic network covering parts of New York and New Jersey. The network is being transformed into sub-networks with stations radio telemetered to smart'' recording stations. The sub-network approach is capable of providing improved data at reduced cost. The major research effort during the period of this report was centered about the Saguenay earthquake sequence in Quebec. L-DGO collaborated with the Canadian Geologic Survey in monitoring aftershocks with temporary local stations. Analysis of data from the 1985 Ardsley earthquake in Westchester county continued with a Green's function deconvolution approach to resolve the dimensions of the rupture of the main shock (Mb=4.0) and of the largest aftershock (Mb=3.0). The results corroborate the 1/2-1 km diameter inferred for the rupture and suggest that the segmentation of the Dobbs Ferry fault and of similar in the Manhattan Prong may be controlling the size of historic earthquakes in the New York City region. Finally, a portable seismograph survey was carried out in Palco, Kansas, which showed clearly that seismicity at Palco was induced. 51 refs,, 8 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 9
}

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  • For almost 20 years, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has operated the primary network for monitoring earthquake activity in the New York State, northern New Jersey, and northwestern Vermont area, with support by both NRC and the USGS. The primary purpose of this research is directed toward the determination of local seismicity and the possible identification of associated geologic and tectonic features. From April 1985 to September 1992, the network recorded and located 346 regional earthquakes. Scientific activity, primarily in the form of aftershock monitoring, was concentrated upon a number of significant earthquakes: The Ardsley, NY; the Chardon, OH; the Ashtabula, OH;more » and the Saguenay, Canada earthquakes; in addition to the Summit, NY event. These studies involved the deployment of portable seismographs in the epicentral areas. Many of these sequences were in northeastern North America, but outside the L-DEO seismic network and were not covered by other permanent networks. Spatial correlations between structures and earthquakes were found at a wide range of scales, and systematic searches of archival material were used to improve constraints on historic sources.« less
  • In the last 21 years the Lamont-Doherty Observatory has studied and monitored seismicity in the northeastern US for the purpose of understanding tectonic processes responsible for seismogenesis in this intraplate area. Central to this effort has been a seismic network covering most of New York State, northern New Jersey, and northern and central Vermont. Temporary networks of portable stations have also been deployed to study aftershocks or other earthquake sequences of special significance. This program has been supported primarily by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by the US Geological Survey. Five digital strong ground motion accelerographs are also operated asmore » part of a Program sponsored by the National Center for Earthquake Engineering. The previously centralized network has been transformed into four cost effective sub-networks with seismic field stations radio telemetered to smart'' recording stations. The major research effort during this year was related to an m2.8 earthquake which occurred on October 25, 1990, near Bridgeton, N.J. The earthquake provided a more accurate velocity model for central New Jersey and additional information regarding the Newark Basin Seismic Zone.« less
  • In the last 21 years the Lamont-Doherty Observatory has studied and monitored seismicity in the northeastern US for the purpose of understanding tectonic processes responsible for seismogenesis in this intraplate area. Central to this effort has been a seismic network covering most of New York State, northern New Jersey, and northern and central Vermont. Temporary networks of portable stations have also been deployed to study aftershocks or other earthquake sequences of special significance. This program has been supported primarily by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by the US Geological Survey. Five digital strong ground motion accelerographs are also operated asmore » part of a Program sponsored by the National Center for Earthquake Engineering. The previously centralized network has been transformed into four cost effective sub-networks with seismic field stations radio telemetered to ``smart`` recording stations. The major research effort during this year was related to an m2.8 earthquake which occurred on October 25, 1990, near Bridgeton, N.J. The earthquake provided a more accurate velocity model for central New Jersey and additional information regarding the Newark Basin Seismic Zone.« less
  • The impacts described for 1985 and 1990 are based on a national energy projection (scenario) which assumes medium energy demand and fuel supply through 1990 but does not incorporate the policies of the National Energy Act (NEA). This scenario, referred to as the Projection Series C or the TRENDLONG MID-MID scenario, is one of six possible energy futures developed by the DOE Energy Information Administration for the Department's 1977 Annual Report to Congress. It was chosen as representative of the official DOE national energy projections when this project was initiated, prior to the passage of the National Energy Act. Themore » environmental impacts discussed in this volume are for Federal Region II, comprising New York and New Jersey.« less
  • Long period surface wave data recorded by the Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) are being analyzed for use as a yield index. We demonstrated that short period yield estimates require a large number (approx.10) of calibration events in a very localized region before we have a reasonable degree of confidence in the yield. Since it is probably not feasible to have the required number of calibration events in a threshold test ban treaty, it is hoped that the longer period waves will average out the source region over a larger area and be less affected by small anomalies. The resultsmore » of the study are promising, and the following conclusions were reached: the surface wave detection threshold is much higher than for short period waves; Rayleigh wave amplitude calibration curves are not much of an improvement over the short period results; and tectonic strain release accounts for a significant portion of energy in the signal, and if a normal strike-slip source is assumed, corrections can be made to reduce the rms to 1.22 in the frequency window from 0.04 to 0.07 Hz.« less